Horrible Names For Horses

barbaro111
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Fri May 24, 2019 5:14 pm

I think Violence is a terrible name for a horse: i mean, why would you name a horse Violence???
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Northport
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Fri May 24, 2019 11:21 pm

I like it. Simple. One word. His dam's name was Violent Beauty. If a champion horse can be named Bonecrusher (another name I love) then Violence ain't nothin'. A little edgier name can be cool.
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WaquoitNBroadBrush
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Sat May 25, 2019 5:39 am

Northport wrote:
Fri May 24, 2019 11:21 pm
I like it. Simple. One word. His dam's name was Violent Beauty. If a champion horse can be named Bonecrusher (another name I love) then Violence ain't nothin'. A little edgier name can be cool.
One-word names are the best. When I see one in the PPs, I always check the pedigree to see if I can figure out the reason behind the name. Last Saturday at Belmont, you had Puffery (by Flatter), Teletype (by Data Link) and Crick (rural pronunciation of "creek," which makes sense since the dam, Kaydeross, was named for a creek in the Saratoga Springs area). Even the one-word names that seemingly had nothing to do with the horses' parentage (Entirely, Ascender, Opt, Inflection) were all excellent horse names. And you can find them everywhere. The first at Suffolk that day was won by the well-named Thrice (by Hat Trick).

Calumet has been giving horses one-word names forever and I've always enjoyed seeing them in the entries and hearing them called during races. Racing could do with more of them and less of the run-on names, Kittens and Cats that infest thoroughbred entries the way Hanovers and Seelsters do standardbred.
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Northport
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Sat May 25, 2019 8:07 pm

Coolmore also gives some good one word names to their mares sometimes. Up, Was, Twirl, Minding, Winter, Tapestry, Soon, etc.

Godolphin Australia has the best one word names. If you don't mind going down a bit of a rabbit hole, their website has all of their horses in training listed, and whoever is in charge of the Aussie names is really killing it.
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Mylute
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Sat May 25, 2019 9:51 pm

Northport wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 8:07 pm
Coolmore also gives some good one word names to their mares sometimes. Up, Was, Twirl, Minding, Winter, Tapestry, Soon, etc.

Godolphin Australia has the best one word names. If you don't mind going down a bit of a rabbit hole, their website has all of their horses in training listed, and whoever is in charge of the Aussie names is really killing it.
Godolphin and Coolmore kill it about 95% of the time, same with Caliborne.

One of their juvies is Taps(War Front x Serene Melody).

Also, about the name Violence, I think it's a-okay. Nothing wrong with being edgy sometimes.
Last edited by Mylute on Sun May 26, 2019 7:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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sweettalk
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Sun May 26, 2019 7:29 pm

i'm a UFC fan and i hate the name Violence.

Taps tho. that's gorgeous when looking at the pedigree.
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Mylute
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 1:00 pm

Grumps Little Tots was second in the Easy Goer.
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~ Robin Williams 1951 - 2̶0̶1̶4̶ ∞
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ElPrado2
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 3:36 pm

Nothing wrong with Violence as a name. I've seen a lot of horses it would fit. Horses are not lap dogs. I've had them attempt to kill me. One Arab stud kicked his owner 15 feet through the stall, across to the wall of the barn and she hit about 7 feet up the wall opposite. Then he went back to screaming about the mare in heat 4 stalls away and trying to climb out of the stall to get to her. The woman lost a kidney, some intestine, gall bladder and the ability to have children. I ran for the phone to call 911 and the woman I had been talking to by her stall made sure she could breathe. She was hospitalized 3 months. The horse was a gelding 3 days later.
barbaro111
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 4:29 pm

ElPrado2 wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 3:36 pm
Nothing wrong with Violence as a name. I've seen a lot of horses it would fit. Horses are not lap dogs. I've had them attempt to kill me. One Arab stud kicked his owner 15 feet through the stall, across to the wall of the barn and she hit about 7 feet up the wall opposite. Then he went back to screaming about the mare in heat 4 stalls away and trying to climb out of the stall to get to her. The woman lost a kidney, some intestine, gall bladder and the ability to have children. I ran for the phone to call 911 and the woman I had been talking to by her stall made sure she could breathe. She was hospitalized 3 months. The horse was a gelding 3 days later.
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BaroqueAgain1
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:28 pm

I kind of blame whoever was responsible for putting a mare in heat just down the aisle from that horse. It's not the stallion's fault that he was put into "I got to breed' mindset, with all those hormones overwhelming any sort of training he might have had. :oops:
Last edited by BaroqueAgain1 on Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Treve
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:36 pm

BaroqueAgain1 wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:28 pm
I kind of blame whoever was responsible for putting a mare is heat just down the aisle from that horse. It's not the stallion's fault that he was put into "I got to breed' mindset, with all those hormones overwhelming any sort of training he might have had. :oops:
I'm sorry but I'll have to disagree, any stallion that behaves like THAT because of a mare in heat absolutely deserved to be gelded... I would have seriously considered euthanasia as well. Having testes is not an excuse at all for that type of behaviour. Only way I'd fault the person who stalled the mare in heat there would be if the stallion had a history of such violent reactions.
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
katmandu
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:51 pm

Very seldom are behavior issues a horse problem (PARTICULARLY if they've escalated to "violent"), they are almost always people created. There are plenty of people that have horses that are beyond their skill level. Plenty of people.

And now back to racing.
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Treve
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:52 pm

katmandu wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:51 pm
Very seldom are behavior issues a horse problem (PARTICULARLY if they've escalated to "violent"), they are almost always people created. There are plenty of people that have horses that are beyond their skill level. Plenty of people.

And now back to racing.
Temperament is strongly genetic and that's particularly observable in Thoroughbred race horses because they aren't selected for or against temperament yet time and time again you see tendencies in certain sirelines and certain families.
You are correct that in most cases (but not all) Human intervention will determine whether it is manageable or not and sometimes the mismanagement brings the animal to a place where it cannot be recuperated. But much like dogs, there are seldom any reasons to tolerate that sort of behaviour in the gene pool.
I wonder why in North America we just accept that stallions are dangerous fire-breathing monsters (and our handling and management reflects that) yet in Europe you regularly have junior riders handling intact stallions, because they actually expect stallions to be civilised (and their management and handling reflects that).
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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Delamont
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:55 pm

katmandu wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:51 pm
Very seldom are behavior issues a horse problem (PARTICULARLY if they've escalated to "violent"), they are almost always people created. There are plenty of people that have horses that are beyond their skill level. Plenty of people.

And now back to racing.
Amen.
lurkey mclurker
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:02 pm

Not to mention that in the particular case of Arab stallions, the "handling" management that goes into prepping them to show at liberty (IMO) pretty much creates a scenario where the horse ends up having little respect for halter or handler. :roll:
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Northport
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Sat Jun 08, 2019 11:48 pm

Treve wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:52 pm
katmandu wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:51 pm
Very seldom are behavior issues a horse problem (PARTICULARLY if they've escalated to "violent"), they are almost always people created. There are plenty of people that have horses that are beyond their skill level. Plenty of people.

And now back to racing.
Temperament is strongly genetic and that's particularly observable in Thoroughbred race horses because they aren't selected for or against temperament yet time and time again you see tendencies in certain sirelines and certain families.
You are correct that in most cases (but not all) Human intervention will determine whether it is manageable or not and sometimes the mismanagement brings the animal to a place where it cannot be recuperated. But much like dogs, there are seldom any reasons to tolerate that sort of behaviour in the gene pool.
I wonder why in North America we just accept that stallions are dangerous fire-breathing monsters (and our handling and management reflects that) yet in Europe you regularly have junior riders handling intact stallions, because they actually expect stallions to be civilised (and their management and handling reflects that).
Are you talking about just Thoroughbreds, or hunters/jumpers? I would argue that there is a lot of drama around how hunter/jumper stallions are handled in North America simply because 90% of the horses at the top level of each discipline are purchased from Europe, and it is simply to show, not to breed.

Most (or at least all of the male horses we have imported) are gelded either a couple weeks before they get on the plane or a couple weeks after they get off. There are very few quality, large scale sporthorse breeders in North America, and even fewer people importing stallions to breed. So at the average show in Wellington, Devon, Indoors, etc. you see very few stallions, except for the top 1% doing the FEI classes. So when you do see a stallion at a show, or have one at your barn, it gets the kid gloves treatment.

In Europe, you have dozens of farms cranking out dozens, if not hundreds, of high quality sport horses every year, and every horse is for sale for the right price. There are so so so many more breeders and dealers who are buying and selling horses, it isn't the junior/amateur consumer based market that North America is. It's just such a different, and bigger, business over there. It isn't the cottage industry that it is here.

A young stallion doing the 6 year old classes could be anything, so he is left intact. Every colt remains a stallion until a Wall Street hedge fund manager buys it for his 14 year old daughter.
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stark
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Sun Jun 09, 2019 9:59 am

Favored to break her maiden in the 8th at Santa Anita today.

Miss Hot Legs
3 F Verrazano - Expo Gold

Maybe Rod Stewart named her?
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
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Treve
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Sun Jun 09, 2019 4:54 pm

Northport wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 11:48 pm
Treve wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:52 pm
katmandu wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:51 pm
Very seldom are behavior issues a horse problem (PARTICULARLY if they've escalated to "violent"), they are almost always people created. There are plenty of people that have horses that are beyond their skill level. Plenty of people.

And now back to racing.
Temperament is strongly genetic and that's particularly observable in Thoroughbred race horses because they aren't selected for or against temperament yet time and time again you see tendencies in certain sirelines and certain families.
You are correct that in most cases (but not all) Human intervention will determine whether it is manageable or not and sometimes the mismanagement brings the animal to a place where it cannot be recuperated. But much like dogs, there are seldom any reasons to tolerate that sort of behaviour in the gene pool.
I wonder why in North America we just accept that stallions are dangerous fire-breathing monsters (and our handling and management reflects that) yet in Europe you regularly have junior riders handling intact stallions, because they actually expect stallions to be civilised (and their management and handling reflects that).
Are you talking about just Thoroughbreds, or hunters/jumpers? I would argue that there is a lot of drama around how hunter/jumper stallions are handled in North America simply because 90% of the horses at the top level of each discipline are purchased from Europe, and it is simply to show, not to breed.
I was talking about all horses, all breeds, all disciplines. There is some variance in mentality from one breed to the next but overall I'd say almost across the board in North America stallions are expected to behave like monsters and their handling is reflected accordingly. By which I mean since we expect stallions to be monsters, we handle them like they are but more importantly, we also allow them to behave in that way, and that behaviour isn't corrected or addressed because "oh he's studdish".

By contrast in Europe intact stallions are expected to be civilized and their handling is reflected accordingly. Poor manners aren't going to be tolerated just because he still has his family jewels.
Interestingly the one breeder I can think of here in North America whom I know allows children to handle, ride and drive some of his studs is originally from Europe and came here with his foundation sire when he was 20, so his mentality in handling stallions reflect what I have personally experienced in Europe.

I only named thoroughbred racehorses as the exception since they aren't selected for temperament (... or even good feet) at all. What you say about the Hunter/Jumper (and could extend to the Dressage) world where sport horse breeds and warmbloods are popular imports definitely does factor in as to scarcity of stallions and how that impacts what we tolerate in the gene pool. Though I'd argue in recent years we are seeing more and more very nice quality stallions here for that world as well, the quality and quantity of Oldenburgs is coming along and so to Hannoverians. The sport pony market has exploded, I recently saw (a really nice one sure) an A-circuit Devon pony being advertised for 250 000$.

But I am getting side-tracked. Point is I agree that the sheer numbers or lack thereof and the way the culture and system (and show/breed surveys) are set up plays a part. But I also definitely think that if we didn't collectively have the mentality of "well stallions are crazy and that's the way it is" we wouldn't be hearing about a stallion kicking his owner through a wall because a mare is in heat 4 stalls down.
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
barbaro111
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Sun Aug 11, 2019 8:16 am

https://www.pedigreequery.com/slimey

Daughter of Quality Road- she has been racing at Saratoga in the past few weeks: Why in the heck would anyone name their horse Slimey?
(it is pronounced like it is usually spelled: Slimy)- I don't understand how owners can give a horse such a terrible name. I feel bad for the horse so I root for her.
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Pirateena
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Sun Aug 11, 2019 5:21 pm

barbaro111 wrote:
Sun Aug 11, 2019 8:16 am
https://www.pedigreequery.com/slimey

Daughter of Quality Road- she has been racing at Saratoga in the past few weeks: Why in the heck would anyone name their horse Slimey?
(it is pronounced like it is usually spelled: Slimy)- I don't understand how owners can give a horse such a terrible name. I feel bad for the horse so I root for her.
God I saw that yesterday... :| Maybe someone's three year old was told to name her.

I hate the name Cloud Computing - its like they're saying 'we don't really care about our horse except as a billboard'.

I kinda laugh when the Jockey Club name reviewer brings up the story behind rejecting 'Hoof Hearted'...'cause I've seen worse that he approved, like 'Are Rated'.
GO KNICKS GO!
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