HBO

Post Reply
stark
Posts: 5110
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 9:55 am
Location: SoCal

Tue May 21, 2019 9:14 pm

Not for the faint of heart....'

Real Sports with Bryant Gumble (10 p.m., HBO) - Enjoy the Kentucky Derby and Preakness? Correspondent Bernard Goldberg’s report on horse racing reveals that more than two thousand horses die racing in the United States each year. TWO THOUSAND. And thousands more are slaughtered after their racing days are over. Goldberg reports on the combination of drugs and overuse that contribute to this nauseating death toll.
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
stark
Posts: 5110
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 9:55 am
Location: SoCal

Tue May 21, 2019 9:16 pm

I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 6039
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Wed May 22, 2019 1:23 am

Just a bunch of regurgitated stuff from the past. Nothing new in that program. Only half the story about the fatalities at Santa Anita...didn't even talk about the record rain that impacted the track, changes in medication rules, stricter pre-race screening, new diagnostic equipment. Was nobody available to talk in defense of the industry...or were they not open to airing anything contrary to their negative agenda?

I'll just post this here. This is what they should have been talking about, if only some intelligent spokesperson in the industry were designated to respond to stuff like this, obviously not the Jockey Club who seem to have their own agenda.

U.S. racing can significantly reduce horse fatalities, but do we have the courage to do it?
In my most recent View from the Rail , I wrote about a new technological innovation, the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan machine, which for the first time provides imaging of the fetlock (ankle) joint while a Thoroughbred is standing.

This equipment is designed to aid in the detection of pre-existing conditions in horses in advance of a race or training. The Stronach Group had just announced it was collaborating on the purchase of a PET scanning machine with the Dolly Green Research Foundation and the University of California-Davis. It is still being tested and will be installed at Santa Anita for this fall’s racing season.

During my research, I took the opportunity to communicate on this technology with Rick Arthur, who is the Equine Medical Director of the California Horse Racing Board and a doctor of veterinary medicine at University of California-Davis.

The PET machine had been developed by a team of veterinary doctors at UC-Davis headed by Dr Matthieu Spriet. At that time, Dr Arthur told me there were many significant projects being funded by the Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation on track surface and equine musculoskeletal research projects. Dr Arthur is a foundation board member and a highly regarded equine veterinarian.

Shortly after my article was published, I received an email from foundation president Jamie Haydon with extensive material on the foundation’s recent activities, including the 2019 funded projects and a summary of the research recently conducted on track surface and musculoskeletal issues.

...

The industry knows that an overwhelming majority of breakdowns occur with horses that have pre-existing injuries. The industry now has some new technological tools and the equine veterinary talent to address this problem and significantly reduce breakdowns in training and racing.

I hope that everyone has come to understand that a spike in breakdowns at one track in the country is not a regional issue. Santa Anita is certainly a high-profile racing association but, if a smaller regional track has the next breakdown spike, the entire industry is going to pay the consequences.

Dr Sue Stover said it best in answer to one of my questions, “We can give the best recommendations for injury prevention, but, if the recommendations are not implementable under the socioeconomic structure of racing, they will never be followed.”

We are fortunate to have an organization like the Grayson-Jockey Club Foundation that is willing to do the research in funding and paying for the talent that can advocate for and protect our most valuable asset, the horse.

We all need to work to support the Grayson-Jockey Club Foundation important initiatives, which will save and transform our racing industry.

People in the industry bemoan the fact that racing does not have a commissioner. Think of the Grayson-JC Foundation as the commissioner of important equine welfare on and off the racetrack.
More: https://www.thoroughbredracing.com/arti ... age-do-it/
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 6039
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Wed May 22, 2019 2:26 am

A voice of reason from Teresa Genaro...

'Raced To Death': HBO's Real Sports Investigates Deaths In Thoroughbred Racing
...
Not even the staunchest defenders of horse racing could deny the brutality of the incidents HBO shows, nor would most even try, but viewers won’t know that. The segment features interviews with a variety of people along a continuum of dissatisfaction with horse racing, from a veterinarian who expresses outrage at the trainers who race sore horses and the veterinarians who able them to do that, to the chairman of The Jockey Club Stuart Janney, who suggests that various industry organizations that resist his organization’s suggestions do so because they want power, to a racing fan-cum-activist who organizes protests at tracks and maintains a list of the horses that die during racing in the United States.

The premise of the episode is that unrestricted drug use by greedy, inhumane trainers is causing horses to die. Left unmentioned are the measures taken by the racing industry to reduce or eliminate the use of a number of medications; left unacknowledged is that in most jurisdictions in the U.S., the only medication that can be administered to a horse on the day it races is furosemide, and that there is no link between its use and equine fatalities. Nor does reporter Bernie Goldberg explain that Quarter Horses are the majority of horses sent to slaughter, leaving the impression that Thoroughbreds are the only horses slaughtered. Goldberg also fails to mention that Congress has repeatedly failed to take action to ban the exportation for slaughter of horses from the U.S. to Mexico and Canada.

According to producer Chapman Downs via a spokesperson, Real Sports was scheduled to speak with Belinda Stronach, chairman and president of The Stronach Group and the woman behind Santa Anita’s recent initiatives, but she later changed her mind about granting the interview, neither of which Goldberg mentioned in the segment.

The problems in horse racing fall largely at the feet of the people who run the sport; intransigent or oblivious, slow to act and quick to circle the wagons, industry organizations deserve most of the criticism they get. That makes it all the more perplexing that a reputable program would produce such a one-sided look at the problems in the sport, calling into question its agenda and what it hopes to accomplish. It’s easy to pile on horse racing these days. Harder, more valuable, and less sensationalist is asking hard questions of the people tasked with the safety and welfare of the horses, and holding them accountable.
More: https://www.forbes.com/sites/teresagena ... 3f66c91fc5
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 6039
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Wed May 22, 2019 2:56 pm

Bradley Weisbord @BradWeisbord
16h16 hours ago
Disgusting side of the sport, that does exist, shown tonight on @RealSportsHBO. We NEED our sports leaders, @jockeyclub, track owners, etc to give LIFETIME BANS to any bad acting vet/trainer. Start a group to find these people, we NEED to limit the amount of equine fatalities.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 6039
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Wed May 22, 2019 3:03 pm

Ray Paulick @raypaulick
1h1 hour ago
"Another equine fatality at Santa Anita was bound to happen again.But to go six entire weeks without such a breakdown was extraordinary. That’s what makes what we now realize is an insatiable media appetite for this type of incident so much more troubling"

Racing’s new normal - “just one damn thing after another”
The quote in the title of this piece is attributed to Arnold J. Toynbee, who wrote a monumental 12-volume series titled, A Study of History.

It’s now an apt description of the horse racing industry in the U.S.

It begins with what would be an unfortunate but otherwise unnoteworthy equine fatality.

Let’s begin with the story posted on the Paulick Report this weekend on Preakness afternoon titled,
“A 24th Horse Dies At Santa Anita, And National Media Takes Notice.”

“After six weeks without an equine fatality, Santa Anita saw its 24th since the start of its winter meet on Friday morning. Commander Coil, who was out for a routine gallop, broke his shoulder and had to be euthanized. According to the Los Angeles Times, which was one of a number of national and local outlets reporting on the incident, some 7,000 timed workouts and an estimated 80,000 non-timed gallops have taken place without incident during the previous six weeks.”

The death of Commander Coil was reported by CNN, ESPN, NBC News, FOX News, and The New York Times.

Another equine fatality at Santa Anita was bound to happen again. But to go six entire weeks without such a breakdown was extraordinary. That’s what makes what we now realize is an insatiable media appetite for this type of incident so much more troubling.

Many in the racing industry thought the respite of fatalities at Santa Anita was a turning point on this issue. Only now do we realize that around every corner lurks another equine fatality and another media storm.

Welcome to racing’s new normal.

What should the racing industry do about it?

Everything!
More: http://blog.horseracingreform.com/post/ ... er-another
Somnambulist
Posts: 7732
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 5:59 pm

Wed May 22, 2019 8:35 pm

Maybe we can get #iamhorseracing back trending so we can let 14th generation industry members tell us nothing is wrong with racing again.
"Life's no piece of cake, mind you, but the recipe's my own to fool with."
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 6039
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Thu May 23, 2019 8:39 pm

Slow to respond, let's hope they keep updating this document and get the info out before the next such incident. Better yet, prepare it in talking points format, publish it on their website, and distribute it to all tracks, commissions, and alphabet soups so we can all get on the same page. Read the entire letter at the link below.

Statement from the National Thoroughbred Racing Association on HBO Real Sports Segment on Horse Racing
“Once again, HBO’s Real Sports presented a slanted, distorted, and inaccurate view of horse racing without acknowledging the important progress our entire industry is making with respect to safety, welfare and aftercare. Today, the strongest push for a higher degree of safety and integrity is actually coming from within the industry, which through its actions is working every day to provide a safer environment for our equine and human athletes. The real facts about horse racing have been shared with HBO directly.”

Alex Waldrop
President and CEO,
National Thoroughbred Racing Association

Click Here to Read the Full Letter
https://www.ntra.com/statement-from-the ... se-racing/
Post Reply