Santa Anita 2019

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Curtis
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Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:26 pm

Sparrow Castle wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 1:48 am
Please have some of these aimed towards the big barns.

Jeremy Balan @jeremybalan
Scott Daruty says Santa Anita will be adding 600 security cameras to the backside.
10:09 AM - 16 Sep 2015
Is this tweet from 2015?
Somnambulist

Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:31 pm

He retweeted himself from 2015 as part of a larger tweet providing commentary the Bill Morley situation with the CHRB.

Obviously don't condone improper use of drugs but it's amazing how what we get out of bad track management/rain is that horseman are at fault.
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Curtis
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Wed Apr 17, 2019 4:19 pm

Somnambulist wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:31 pm
He retweeted himself from 2015 as part of a larger tweet providing commentary the Bill Morley situation with the CHRB.

Obviously don't condone improper use of drugs but it's amazing how what we get out of bad track management/rain is that horseman are at fault.
Thanks, I don’t do twitter so I’m admittedly ignorant about it. I remember the statement about the security cameras from back then. Maybe they can put cameras on the track maintenance crew.
stark
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Wed Apr 17, 2019 4:34 pm

Curtis wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 4:19 pm
Somnambulist wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:31 pm
He retweeted himself from 2015 as part of a larger tweet providing commentary the Bill Morley situation with the CHRB.

Obviously don't condone improper use of drugs but it's amazing how what we get out of bad track management/rain is that horseman are at fault.
Thanks, I don’t do twitter so I’m admittedly ignorant about it. I remember the statement about the security cameras from back then. Maybe they can put cameras on the track maintenance crew.
That's not quite as funny as it sounds. I had a friend who knew a guy on the track crew.......would get an occasional phone call "we really went over the inside extra hard, it's very tight in lanes one and two today"
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Apr 17, 2019 8:02 pm

Oh yeah, sorry I forgot to add that's how some think Bill Morley's barn was caught milkshaking.

Letter to the Editor: Racing Surfaces Risks
Recent misstatements and misquotes in the press and in social media have led to some confusion about what we know about racing surfaces. While the development of an optimal racing surface remains elusive, the last 20 years has seen considerable progress in our understanding. On the topic of racing surfaces we have during this time published 14 studies in refereed journals, advised two PhD dissertations and four Master’s theses and, whenever possible, put these ideas into practice. The challenge remains; the inconsistency of racing surfaces in a range of climates and weather must be reduced.

This somewhat eclectic mixture of an engineer and an equine orthopaedic surgeon first got together at Colorado State University (CSU) in 1998. We started with the biological question of cyclic trauma and bone microdamage leading to fracture (characterized by Chris Kawcak in his PhD work at CSU) and then started on the best engineering approach. Our first study examined the possible effects of different dirt racetrack surfaces by using dynamic modeling of the horse and track to quantify the vertical loading of the lower limb, which was published in 2000. With the support of AQHA Racing, we then developed a biomechanical test machine to replicate the loads and speeds of a Thoroughbred forelimb at the gallop, this machine was used to evaluate hoof track interface in racehorses as well as the effects of track maintenance on mechanical properties at Hollywood Park, Santa Anita and Del Mar. Like many studies, this effort raised more questions than it answered. However, we quickly moved from understanding to trying to reduce the inconsistency we observed.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/le ... ces-risks/
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Apr 17, 2019 10:09 pm

Lasix Phase-Out Plan Yet to Involve Horsemen
A proposed phasing-out of race-day Lasix starting in 2020 that is being discussed by track operators in Kentucky and New York has yet to formally involve representatives from the Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association (HBPA), Eric Hamelback, the group’s national chief executive, told TDN Wednesday afternoon.

“The groups that own racetracks have every right to discuss safety measures for the industry. Any kind of discussions for safety are positive discussions,” Hamelback said. “But there were no direct discussions with the HBPA about this as a proposal. I checked with the Kentucky HBPA, and there wasn’t even a formal discussion. The overall feeling–mine and theirs–is we certainly need to listen to what any track wants to propose as a safety measure.

“But at this point all horsemen are going to take the same stance” regarding Lasix, Hamelback continued. “We are, and are going to continue, to follow what the veterinary leadership tells us is best for the horse. We can continue to be labeled as obstructionists, but I like to think that [by keeping the status quo] we’re acting in the horses’ best interest and acting alongside with the veterinary leadership community on this issue.”

On Apr. 16, Daily Racing Form first reported that officials from Churchill Downs, Keeneland, and the New York Racing Association are set to announce a plan–possibly as early as this week–that would prohibit race-day Lasix usage for 2-year-olds starting in 2020. The ban would “then be expanded to all stakes at the tracks in 2021,” including the GI Kentucky Derby and GI Belmont S.

Joe Appelbaum, the president of the New York Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, confirmed via phone that he knows a phase-out plan is in the pipeline, but he wanted to defer commenting on it until the tracks make an official announcement.

Hamelback said the HBPA would be comfortable participating in Lasix discussions with Kentucky tracks so long as veterinary leadership groups like the American Association of Equine Practitioners are also consulted.

In 2017, when proposed Horseracing Integrity Act legislation sought to end national use of race-day Lasix, the AAEP released a statement that read, in part, “The AAEP’s current policy on race-day medication administration endorses the use of furosemide [Lasix] to help mitigate the occurrence of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in the racehorse. This policy is based on the overwhelming body of international scientific and clinical evidence.”

When asked if he thought the proposed Lasix phase-out was more of a public-relations reaction to a potential national welfare crisis brought about by 23 recent equine fatalities at Santa Anita Park instead of a true “what’s best for the horse” plan of action, Hamelback chose his words carefully before responding.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/la ... -horsemen/
Somnambulist

Wed Apr 17, 2019 10:11 pm

More reactive measures instead of proactive ones. I guess I should be grateful for anything.

I suppose the worst is that the industry is taking the measures in a desperate form to look good as opposed to doing this to truly better itself. That will ultimately be it's downfall.

This industry is making the same mistakes the NFL did a number of years ago (The NFL being the only sport I really follow outside of racing) except it does not have a fanbase that any fraction of can just go MIA in the night like the NFL does.
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:49 pm

Yeah, they're all over the place and making illogical connections. I think the racetracks in Kentucky and New York are missing the point just as badly as TSG...point being preventing breakdowns and fatalities. Racetrack owners are even worse at leading the change we need than the state racing commissions. I'm okay with dealing with PR stuff too as long as it doesn't take the focus away from track safety, illegal drug use, and identifying at risk horses. That's not what I see happening though and it doesn't surprise me.

I love this from the Letter to the Editor I posted above:
The injury of a horse or rider is a failure of multiple systems, including pre-race exams, the inability to recognize early microdamage, medication rules and preparation of the racing surface. In other words, either the nearly perfect horse on an imperfect surface or an imperfect horse on the nearly perfect surface provides opportunity for catastrophic injury.
This is where we must put our focus and our dollars. I keep waiting impatiently for this kind of call to action by people who have the power and intelligence to lead it.
stark
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Thu Apr 18, 2019 11:31 am

Question....
Back in the day when NYRA was the only Lasix-free track in America, what did they use instead?
And please don't tell me hay, oats and water, thanks.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xp ... story.html
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
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ElPrado2
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Thu Apr 18, 2019 12:18 pm

Ok.
I won't.
But NY tracks had a bunch of thirsty horses.
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Curtis
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Thu Apr 18, 2019 12:40 pm

stark wrote:
Thu Apr 18, 2019 11:31 am
Question....
Back in the day when NYRA was the only Lasix-free track in America, what did they use instead?
And please don't tell me hay, oats and water, thanks.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xp ... story.html
My daughter just presented her senior thesis on the effects of Lasix. When she was getting started, she asked me for advice and I asked her to look up what she could on Demon’s Begone, Summer Squall and Unbridled. Demon’s Begone bled as the favorite in the 1987 KY Derby to the extent he was pulled up on the backstretch when Pat Day noticed blood being splattered on his silks. The other two split the first two legs of the 1990 TC. Summer Squall skipped the Belmont as he was a known, profound bleeder. Unbridled tried it but stopped cold on the far turn certainly acting as if he bled. I told her of an article, pre-1990 Belmont, which went into detail what was being done with Unbridled—who was prone to bleed, albeit not to the extent of the other two mentioned—to prepare him for the Belmont. I remember about purposely dehydrating him. She did find that article and used video of the ‘87 Derby and ‘90 Belmont as part of her project. Thursday’s are busy days for her. I’ll try to get ahold of her and find out more. The project met with rave reviews. Her professor researched the effect of Lasix when she was in vet school.
stark
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Thu Apr 18, 2019 2:20 pm

I distinctly remember a West coast trainer going back to NY for a big race and a reporter asked " are you concerned about their no-lasix policy? And the trainer said "I'm not at all worried, they've got stuff there to take care of it, I don't even know what it is, but my horse is going to run great"
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
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Curtis
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Thu Apr 18, 2019 2:32 pm

stark wrote:
Thu Apr 18, 2019 2:20 pm
I distinctly remember a West coast trainer going back to NY for a big race and a reporter asked " are you concerned about their no-lasix policy? And the trainer said "I'm not at all worried, they've got stuff there to take care of it, I don't even know what it is, but my horse is going to run great"
I’m shocked and utterly dismayed that it wasn’t revealed in the article.😉
BaroqueAgain1
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Thu Apr 18, 2019 2:55 pm

I've read in several places that the main option for horses running without Lasix is early withdrawal of water on race day, leaving runners dehydrated.
When watching races like the Arc, I've noticed that the winners are immediately presented with a bucket of water, even before they get through the victory ceremony. And, boy, do the horses drink! :(
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:20 pm

I've lost track of how much of this got posted.

Partial Lasix ban reaches widespread agreement
A group of tracks representing nearly 90 percent of the total handle on U.S. races, including all three hosts of the Triple Crown races, have agreed to seek a ban on the raceday use of the diuretic furosemide in all of their 2-year-old races beginning next year and then extend the ban to all of their stakes races in 2021, the group confirmed on Thursday morning.
More: https://www.drf.com/news/partial-lasix- ... ment?type=

Industry Reaction To Racetrack Coalition’s Proposed Partial Phase-Out Of Lasix
https://www.paulickreport.com/news/the- ... -of-lasix/

National HBPA’s Hamelback: Announced initiative to ban Lasix ‘should not be seen as safety reform’
https://nationalhbpa.com/national-hbpas ... ty-reform/


And for your reading pleasure two articles about the CHRB meeting yesterday:

'I don't hop on a dog and ride it' -- Horse racing industry under fire after deaths at California track
https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/18/us/c ... index.html

Santa Anita to continue racing despite protests
https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/h ... /39364297/
BaroqueAgain1
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Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:27 pm

Pushing to ban Lasix as a response to physical breakdowns on the track feels like making Nascar drivers change their cars' paint schemes in order to prevent wrecks. :roll:
stark
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Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:51 pm

BaroqueAgain1 wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:27 pm
Pushing to ban Lasix as a response to physical breakdowns on the track feels like making Nascar drivers change their cars' paint schemes in order to prevent wrecks. :roll:
I'm surprised nobody is trying to protect the wagering public by limiting transactions to $50.
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Apr 19, 2019 4:21 pm

Santa Anita cancels five Thursday cards due to horse shortage
Santa Anita has eliminated the next five Thursdays from the racing schedule in light of a reduction in race-ready horses in Southern California.

Tim Ritvo, chief operating officer of The Stronach Group, the track’s parent company, said on Friday that Santa Anita will race Fridays through Sundays for the next four weeks. The track is scheduled to race Friday, May 24, through Monday, May 27 on the week of Memorial Day. Racing was not scheduled for Thursday, May 30, when the original calendar was published.

Ritvo said no decision has been made whether to race on the final three Thursdays of the meeting – June 6, 13, and 20. The season concludes June 23.

“As we progress, we’ll see where we’re at,” Ritvo said. “We’ve lost some of our horse population.”

In recent weeks, several stables have shipped horses to Kentucky for the lucrative spring meeting at Keeneland and in anticipation of the Churchill Downs meeting, which begins April 27.
More: https://www.drf.com/news/santa-anita-ca ... e-shortage
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Apr 19, 2019 4:39 pm

Sorry, I've just got to say it...in that kind of mood today. I hope the AAEP's strategies include racetracks re-building the stable areas. Each horse will have access to fresh air, paddocks and grassy grazing areas, as well as no dusty stall bedding and no hay storage over the heads of horses. If racetracks want to lead the elimination of Lasix, they can play a big role in managing horses without it.

AAEP’s Berk Issues Statement on Furosemide Prohibition
...

“The AAEP also is committed to funding research into alternative EIPH management strategies which would eliminate the need to administer furosemide on race day. The proposed phase-out of the medication’s use beginning at many Thoroughbred racetracks in 2020 emphasizes the urgent need for continued research into new methods for mitigating EIPH.

“Regarding the daily care of horses adversely affected by EIPH, the AAEP urges a strong partnership between owners, trainers and veterinarians in order to optimally manage the syndrome and make decisions in the best interest of the health and welfare of the horse.”
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/aa ... ohibition/
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Apr 19, 2019 5:09 pm

Santa Anita: Seismic Changes & Uncertainty Leave Stakeholders Both Hopeful and Worried
Fittingly given California’s tectonic foundations, the massive jolts that have ruptured the racing industry here in the Golden State over the past seven weeks have indeed been seismic, shaking and shifting the very ground into which thousands of trainers, breeders, owners, jockeys, racetrack staff, handicappers, and all others kind of ancillary industry support have set root.

But now as the initial fallout is beginning to lose intensity, so too is the dust beginning to settle on the rearranging landscape, giving many the chance to look around and take stock at the shifts that have also reverberated nationwide. Just this Thursday, a consortium of racetracks around the country announcedthat they are following The Stronach Group’s lead and phasing out the use of Lasix, starting with 2-year-old-racing in 2020, followed by the elimination of Lasix in black-type races the following year.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/sa ... d-worried/
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