Hurricane Irma

PJMIII
Posts: 9550
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:12 am

Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:36 am

Hurricane Irma: What we know now and where it's headed next

Hurricane Irma claimed the lives of at least 10 people across the Caribbean as the powerful Category 5 storm's 185-mph winds swept past Puerto Rico toward the Dominican Republic and Haiti. It could be on a collision course with South Florida over the weekend. If Irma hits the U.S. as a Category 5 storm, it would be just the fourth hurricane of that strength to do so in recorded history.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/201 ... 640794001/
User avatar
Ballerina
Posts: 3055
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA & Saratoga, NY

Thu Sep 07, 2017 12:22 pm

If you're in the path of this hurricane but do not need to evacuate - here are some helpful hints. A good supply of water is of utmost importance.

1. For a big storm like Irma, you need enough water to drink for 7 days. The water does NOT have to be bottled. You can simply buy water containers and fill them with tap water.

2. Get a plastic sheet to line the tub. Then you can fill your tub with water without it leaking out. You'll use this to flush the toilet and for basic cleaning if the water goes out.

3. Have enough food on hand to eat for 7 days - food bars and other packaged food is good.

4. Buy a large number of Ziploc-like plastic bags - large and small. You'll use them to protect papers and other valuables AND you'll fill them 3/4 full of water and stuff the freezer full. Do that by midweek to be sure they are frozen when/if the power goes out over the weekend. It will keep the refrigerator colder. Do NOT set your fridge on the lowest setting.

5. Get a portable radio that receives AM and FM. NOAA radio is good, but doesn't get you information on evacuations and other instructions. Get batteries.

6. Get LED flashlights and/or lanterns. They run forever on fewer batteries. But you still need plenty of extra batteries.

7. Get large plastic bags. They are invaluable for keeping valuable things dry if you have a leak.

8. Get large plastic boxes. If you put your valuables, photos, and papers in plastic bags inside the boxes, they will likely be okay.

9. Get plastic sheeting and plenty of duct tape.

10. Do your laundry this week! Lol

Just in case.....A few hurricane tricks for those who may need it:

1. Start running your ice makers now and bagging the ice in freezer bags. Fill as much space in between your freezer items as you can.

2. Freeze regular tap water for pets, cleaning or drinking in tupperware-type containers. REMEMBER to leave a small bit of space between the top of the water & the lids so the ice expands but doesn't crack the container.

3. Start using up your perishables to make more room for ice in the freezer.

4. Fill up all vehicles & check tires & oil.

5. Cash from ATM, at least enough to get you through tolls and gas out of town. Call your bank if you plan on leaving the state so they don't freeze your card for out-of-area "suspicious" transactions.

6. All important docs screenshot & send to your email. Take originals in sealed bags or plastic bins.

7. Pet & livestock food & supplies. Vet records in case you need to shelter then at a storm-safe facility.

8. Evacuation plans and share with family members so they know where you're headed.

9. Consider putting heirlooms & photos in plastic bins in a high place, second floor, or safe room if you don't plan on taking them with you.

10. SECURE ALL FIREARMS & AMMUNITION PROPERLY.

11. Old rags & beach towels on your windowsills. Even with the best windows & shutters, water seeping from the wind pressure happens. A few damp towels is better than soaked drywall or floors!

12. Shutter windows and doors and bring everything outside into your garage or house NOW. Do not wait until the day before. Better to get done early and relax than wait until its too late, ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE MANDATORY PERSONNEL (hospital employee or first responder).

13. If you don't already have your hurricane supplies, you might want to get them now. Shelves are already empty in most places.
Feel free to copy & paste! Let's share this post & spread the word!

Be safe, everyone
Be Safe!
BaroqueAgain1
Posts: 9879
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:16 pm

Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:11 pm

Great advice, Bal. Thanks.
I am really worried about all the Caribbean islands, like Barbuda and St. Martin, that Irma just slammed. Hurricane Jose has become a Cat. 2, and appears to be following nearly the same path Irma did. :(
Somnambulist
Posts: 7382
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 5:59 pm

Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:43 pm

Please also just buy wind coverage in Florida. I know it's expensive or can be but this is why you do it. So many clients decline this and I'm crossing all my limbs for them that there is no damage.

Also keep in mind your homeowners insurance EXCLUDES flood. You have NO coverage in a flood from a named storm. Sigh..
"Life's no piece of cake, mind you, but the recipe's my own to fool with."
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4963
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:03 pm

750 Horses Evacuated from Gulfstream, Others Stay Put
With Hurricane Irma bearing down on the Florida coast, Gulfstream officials have ordered the evacuation of the barns they felt were most vulnerable to damage from the storm. According to Bill Badgett Jr., a member of the upper management team at the track, about 750 horses have already left the track. Trainers were given the option of either sending them to Ocala or to Palm Meadows.

The barns that were evacuated were the ones closest to the backstretch entrance on Hallandale Beach Boulevard. Not only are they the oldest barns on the Gulfstream backstretch but they are in a lower-lying area than other barns are more prone to flooding.

“The good thing was there was so much notice in advance, we are able to jump on this thing before it got too bad,” Badgett said. “We started preparations a couple of days ago and we’ve gotten the horses out. On top of everything else, we’ve been dealing with a shortage of horse vans. But everybody has been working diligently to help one another out.”

Badgett said about 500 horses will remain on the Gulfstream backstretch through the impending storm. They will all be housed in the newer barns or tents that serve as barns. In addition, the nearly 450 horses stabled at Gulfstream Park West are, for the most part, remaining there, Badgett said.
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/75 ... oI.twitter
BaroqueAgain1
Posts: 9879
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:16 pm

Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:34 pm

"...or tents that serve as barns."

:o :shock: TENTS!? What dimbulb thought it was a good idea to put horses in tents during a hurricane? :roll:
Tents...otherwise known as those scraps of canvas that go sailing away in high winds. And Irma is going to hit with at least Cat. 4 winds.
:evil: :evil: :evil:

And Jose is now a Cat. 3. Poor St. Martin and Baruda. :(
Last edited by BaroqueAgain1 on Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Ballerina
Posts: 3055
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA & Saratoga, NY

Thu Sep 07, 2017 8:36 pm

BaroqueAgain1 wrote:"...or tents that serve as barns."

:o :shock: TENTS!? What dimbulb thought it was a good idea to put horses in tents during a hurricane? :roll:
Tents...otherwise known as those scraps of canvas that going sailing away in high winds. And Irma is going to hit with at least Cat. 4 winds.

(
“The tents are hurricane safe up to 175 mile-per-hour winds,” Badgett said. “At Gulfstream West, it looks like that’s actually going to be a pretty good place to be because and they won’t get the big hit from the ocean side.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4963
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:06 pm

I can't imagine how any kind of a tent could stand up to a Cat 4, but I'm not a structural engineer. And I hope they are correct about Irma's path. I think my horses would be in Kentucky by now, but I have a horrible fear of severe storms and tornadoes.

Last Chance to Move Horses to Palm Meadows
Any horseman stabled at Gulfstream Park or Gulfstream Park West that still wishes to move horses to Palm Meadows ahead of the storm should contact Gulfstream management immediately (John Hoffman, PJ Campo or Billy Badgett). There are approximately 250 stalls still available as of Thursday night and any move would likely have to be arranged by Friday morning, September 8, due to availability of personnel, bedding, etc.

All rooms have been taken but horsemen have advised that they will make accommodations available for those that need it.

Horsemen are urged to consider that the storm is not only about the destruction of facilities but the incredible hardships that must be overcome once the storm has moved on.
http://floridahbpa.com/last-chance-move ... m-meadows/
Somnambulist
Posts: 7382
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 5:59 pm

Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:12 pm

You'd be surprised what people make out there. I don't doubt that it's true.
"Life's no piece of cake, mind you, but the recipe's my own to fool with."
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4963
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:32 pm

Somnambulist wrote:You'd be surprised what people make out there. I don't doubt that it's true.
Good to hear. There's a lot riding on these structures in Irma's path. Not much is slowing it down until it slams Florida.
User avatar
Ballerina
Posts: 3055
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA & Saratoga, NY

Fri Sep 08, 2017 10:11 am

Image

EMPTY YOUR DISHWASHER AND PUT ANYTHING YOU WANT TO PRESERVE IN THERE. It's waterproof and secured to cabinets so it's more likely to survive a storm. For extra protection, place items in zip lock bags before placing in dishwasher.
User avatar
Ballerina
Posts: 3055
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA & Saratoga, NY

Fri Sep 08, 2017 10:38 am

Image
Somnambulist
Posts: 7382
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 5:59 pm

Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:36 pm

Ballerina wrote:Image

EMPTY YOUR DISHWASHER AND PUT ANYTHING YOU WANT TO PRESERVE IN THERE. It's waterproof and secured to cabinets so it's more likely to survive a storm. For extra protection, place items in zip lock bags before placing in dishwasher.
No one should be doing this. I have had so many people ask this today.

There is still a hose with the dishwasher and water back up can happen with this which would effectively ruin everything in it.
"Life's no piece of cake, mind you, but the recipe's my own to fool with."
User avatar
Ballerina
Posts: 3055
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA & Saratoga, NY

Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:50 pm

Somnambulist wrote:
Ballerina wrote:Image

EMPTY YOUR DISHWASHER AND PUT ANYTHING YOU WANT TO PRESERVE IN THERE. It's waterproof and secured to cabinets so it's more likely to survive a storm. For extra protection, place items in zip lock bags before placing in dishwasher.
No one should be doing this. I have had so many people ask this today.

There is still a hose with the dishwasher and water back up can happen with this which would effectively ruin everything in it.
That's why I added to place items in zip-lock bags in case there's a dishwasher fail. Also, a lot of dishwashers are connected to electricity in an outlet under the sink. Disconnect. Basically, there is no truly safe place during a cat 4 hurricane. You do the best you can.
Catalina
Posts: 3206
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2013 5:08 pm
Location: South Texas

Fri Sep 08, 2017 4:44 pm

Thanks for posting the hurricane guidelines - always good to have, and wouldn't hurt to have a designated crate with a copy thereof, ziplock-style freezer bags, batteries, canned petfood and the like, so at least the basics would be easily to hand for quickly assembling the whole kit.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4963
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:48 pm

Ocala Also Bracing For Irma’s Punch
While Hurricane Irma is expected to do its worst damage in Florida in the Miami and Dade County areas, it appears that Ocala, located in Marion County, is not going to be spared. The latest forecasts are calling for Irma to hit the Ocala area early Monday and to bring with it winds of up to 100 miles per hour. That has farm owners and other horsemen, many of whom have taken in horses fleeing Gulfstream, busily preparing to do everything they can to keep their horses, employees and property as safe as possible.

“Our barns are really strong structurally,” said Glen Hill Farm President and CEO Craig Bernick. “We have had hurricanes where we’ve lost power for a couple of weeks. We have generators and we have wells on the farm. We can feed the horses and take care of them. I think this will bother the people more than the horses.”

Bernick continued, “I think it’s going to be OK. If it’s going to be an ‘end-of-the-world’ storm, none of us are going to be OK, but our farm is probably in as good a situation as any in Ocala.”

Ocala Stud sold its first crop of 2-year-olds in 1958, so the team there has plenty of experience dealing with difficult weather situations in Florida. Michael O’Farrell, who runs the operation with his sons, says the horses have an innate ability to handle storms on their own, one of the reasons why many horses at their Ocala farm will spend the storm outside.

“The horses that are outside are in great shape,” he said. “They are smart and they weather storms pretty good. They’ll find the lowest spots in field, they’ll lay down with their butts to the wind or they’ll stand up with their butts to the wind. They gravitate to the lowest area in the field and they handle it. The ones who are out, that’s the safest place to be. If you’re in a barn, trees can blow down on the roofs, which scares the horses inside and that’s when they get hurt. In most cases horses are better off out than in.”

O’Farrell said horses in training will not be let outside for the storm.

“With the horses we have in training, you can’t just all of a sudden turn them out; they’re too fit it and will run like hell and hurt themselves. The ones that stay out are broodmares and the yearlings that aren’t going to sales. They’re normally out 22 hours a day anyways, so they are used to being out.”

While Ocala will be far from the ideal place to weather the storm once Irma hits, most feel it is a better alternative than staying in South Florida. Gulfstream has ordered the evacuation of nearly 750 horses from its backstretch and many have showed up in Ocala. Tom Ventura, the president of the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company, said 400 stalls on the sales grounds have been promised to horsemen fleeing from the south. He did not know, however, if all 400 will show up, as some horsemen have told him they have changed their minds and are going to keep their horses at home.

“We’re fielding calls from people constantly and we are trying to be a safe haven for people,” he said. “It’s been a real challenge for people to get here from Miami. It usually takes about four hours and one guy said it took him 8 1/2 and I hear others have had a worse time. Everybody here is prepared and everybody is cognizant that this has the potential of being a very serious storm, the most significant hurricane to hit Ocala since I have been here. We have had storms here in the past and have always come out of them in pretty good shape. We have very strong block barns.”

Randy Bradshaw, who runs a training and breaking facility in Ocala, has taken in 12 show horses from Wellington.

“We’re just hoping it goes in a different direction, out into the Atlantic,” Bradshaw said. “There’s not a whole lot you can do. You Just prepare and do the best you can. One good thing about Florida is it can take a lot of water and then in a day or two it dries up. That helps. I think we’re as prepared as we can be.”

Each of the individuals interviewed by the TDN said they are well stocked on gasoline, water and food for the horses, all things that are essential and can become scarce during a hurricane. If the storm lives up to expectations, it is likely that many of the farms and training centers will lose power.

“Our corner gas station has been out of gas for a couple of days,” Bradshaw said. “Luckily, we’ve got everything filled up and I have a 150 gallon gas tank here on the farm, which we’ve filled up. That’s for the generators. I’ve even got a jet ski if the water gets too deep. Let’s hope I don’t have to use that.”

The weather reporters are still debating about when the storm will hit Ocala and how strong it will be. But it’s coming. Marianne Siegel, a small breeder with three mares, knows that because her horses are telling her so. She plans to keep her three mares in a large open paddock during Irma.

“They’re amazing, ” she said. “It’s beautiful and sunny here today, but they are sensing that something is coming. They’re standing in middle of the paddock with their butts turned to the south. They knows what’s coming and that’s why they are standing where they are with their butts turned to where the weather is coming from. They know.”
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/oc ... Yg.twitter
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4963
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Fri Sep 08, 2017 8:08 pm

Dozens of carriage horses from coast evacuating to Monroe after threat of Irma
http://m.wbtv.com/wbtv/db_330734/conten ... d=1VQJHu52
MONROE, NC (WBTV) - A carriage tour company in Monroe is now a temporary home to more than 50 carriage horses who've been evacuated from the coastal towns of Savannah and Charleston ahead of Hurricane Irma.
Friday afternoon, two trailers pulled into Bridger Medlin's farm on the outskirts of Monroe after an almost five-hour trailer ride.
Medlin owns Southern Breezes Tour Company that operates horse-drawn rides in uptown Charlotte. He considered the possible fate of the horses owned by companies along the coast and offered a place to keep them safe.
"We're a small family and we're tight knit. I just figured it was the right thing to do," Medlin said.
During Hurricane Matthew, some livestock were killed by floodwaters or left trapped for days in standing water.
Medlin said he's more than willing to do what he can to spare other owners and horses that same fate.
Copyright 2017 WBTV. All rights reserved.
BaroqueAgain1
Posts: 9879
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:16 pm

Sat Sep 09, 2017 12:57 am

North America is truly being shown the raw power of the Four Elements this week: The Pacific Northwest has been hit with devastating wild Fires; Mexico's Pacific coast was hit with an 8.2 Earthquake, the strongest in a century; and the Caribbean and Gulf are being hammered with Air and Water by record-setting Cat. 5* Irma, Cat. 4 Jose, and Cat. 2 Katia.

*Just saw that Irma has regained Cat. 5 wind speed. And Jose is a 4. :shock:
After what Irma did, if the neighboring islands don't manage a Dunkirk-style flotilla of boats and aircraft to evacuate Baruda and St. Martin, Jose may be the most deadly of the two in terms of loss of life. :(
User avatar
Starine
Posts: 4096
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2014 12:39 am
Location: South Carolina

Sun Sep 10, 2017 12:41 pm

My father is in Jacksonville receiving cancer treatment. Yesterday I asked if he regretted not evacuating.

"Not at all," he answered confidently. "We have bottled water and food, and I moved the car to the upper level of a parking deck." He paused.

"I also bought a nonelectric cooker, but I'm hoping I won't have to use it so I can return it next week."
BaroqueAgain1
Posts: 9879
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:16 pm

Mon Sep 11, 2017 12:24 am

Bless the folks who went the extra mile to protect the animals, like these two roommates:
http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation- ... 55117.html
:D
Post Reply