Random News about Breeding and Breeders

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Sparrow Castle
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Sat Jun 16, 2018 4:49 pm

This is very sad. Not posting in the In memoriam thread until his death is officially declared.

Gentry Taken Off Life Support
Olin Gentry, who collapsed from a `massive stroke’ at the OBS Sale Friday, has been taken off life support at the North Florida Regional Medical Center, a stroke facility in Gainesville, Florida, according to his close friend Tom Van Meter. “Olin collapsed at the sale at OBS yesterday,” said Van Meter. “He had a massive stroke at that time. He was basically brain dead at that point. They kept him on life support for a 24-hour period, and that ended today. He has been taken off life support. His son was with him, his closest friends, we were all there,” said Van Meter. “Ciaran Dunne, myself, his signifcant other Athena, we were all with him.” Van Meter said that Gentry had been at the Wavertree barn when the collapse happened. “It was so great that he was doing what he loved to do, which was making a horse trade at the horse sale. He was with his buddies. But it was way too soon, and it’s brutally painful.” Van Meter said that Gentry was 51 years old. More details will be added as they become available.
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/ge ... X0.twitter
BaroqueAgain1
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Sat Jun 16, 2018 5:29 pm

Only 51? Damn. :(
Condolences to his family and friends, for whom this must be a terrible shock.
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Jun 22, 2018 4:37 pm

Body and Soul: All Hail!
By Robert D. Fierro
Bob Fierro is a partner with Jay Kilgore and Frank Mitchell in DataTrack International, biomechanical consultants and developers of BreezeFigs. He can be reached at bbfq@earthlink.net.
The other day we rolled down various leading sires lists in search of a topic for this installment and immediately came to a halt. That’s because we noticed that Eclipse champion Blame had suddenly snuck up a few of those lists to the point where he has to be considered a serious bet after what was probably a fair assessment that–echoing his racing career–he’d gotten off to a slow start as a sire.

That statement was not meant to be anything other than a logical observation. One has to consider that even though he is from one of the most incredible families of the past 75 years–that of *Rough Shod II, his fifth dam–it was always his sire, and his sire line, which was mostly greeted with a bit of hesitancy by a market oversaturated with commercial hyperventilation. But with ten stakes winners this year (four graded), headed by filly Fault (GI Santa Margarita S.) and the turf colt Maraud (GII American Turf S.), attention must be paid.

But the eyebrows were arched when we continued scrolling down the list and discovered that his deceased sire, Arch, and his now exported (to Korea) speedball son, Archarcharch, were ranked among the top 50 sires in cumulative 2018 earnings. To double check, we ran the 2017 list–and they were in the Top 55 at the end of the year. That’s an interesting discovery for a branch of a sire line that snuck up on a lot of people and is often overlooked by more, i.e. that of Kris S., a son of Roberto.

Taking a step back, we wondered how other Roberto branches were doing and discovered of course, that there’s only one other which is prominent in North America, that of Dynaformer. The latter has some young sons at stud, but only Temple City and second-crop sire Point of Entry are beginning to make any noise that might compete with that of Blame. One reason is that aside from the ill-fated Barbaro (whose full brother Lentenor is now at stud), many good racing sons of Dynaformer were geldings.

More interestingly, except for Darby Creek Road, Lear Fan and Silver Hawk, each of whom had successful records but never established viable branches, the sons of Roberto who left sons behind did so overseas, e.g., Brian’s Time in Japan and Red Ransom in Australia.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/bo ... l-all-hail
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Sparrow Castle
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Tue Jul 03, 2018 3:23 pm

Increased Turf Opportunities Will Re-Strengthen the Breed
By Sid Fernando
Updated: March 24, 2018 at 1:25 pm
In 1991, only 5% of all flat races in the United States were on turf. By last year, that figure had risen to 17%. The incremental increase of turf racing over the past 27 years is vivid in the accompanying graph, which was extrapolated from racing data provided by researcher Chris Rossi (See below). This trend to turf is even more significant than the data suggests because in 2017 there were almost 50% fewer races than in 1991. The net effect is that turf racing is playing a greater role in the sport as the industry shrinks. Throw in that 39% of graded races in America were contested on turf in 2017, and you get the picture.

Stud farms in Kentucky have been adjusting to the change. In 2018, 14 Kentucky nurseries are offering 30 stallions that either won or placed in Grade I turf races (plus one, Violence, who was a Grade I winner on all-weather) with first foals age three or younger (See Chart below). That’s a revelation, but it’s not unexpected, because the trend line in the Rossi data suggests that turf racing will continue to grow in the ensuing years. Note that the Breeders’ Cup recently announced that its newest race is a $1-million sprint on turf for juveniles.

“Well, there was a prejudice against turf sires at one point,” said Pope McLean Sr. of Crestwood Farm, which stands the War Front horse Jack Milton. “For a while, people just didn’t want to touch them, but recently, with Kitten’s Joy and others like War Front, and even a horse like Artie Schiller, breaking barriers, things are changing. We were pretty pleased to get 100-plus mares to Jack Milton in his first year, and they seem to have caught on at the sales, too.”

Back in 1991, Walmac International’s Nureyev led all U.S.-based sires by yearling average and Claiborne Farm’s Danzig led the North American General Sire List. Both sons of Northern Dancer were outstanding turf sires and were favorites of European buyers, just as Danzig’s son War Front, also at Claiborne, is today. But Nureyev and Danzig operated in a different landscape than do War Front and Kitten’s Joy. For example, when Kitten’s Joy led the General Sire List in 2013, he did so primarily with domestic turf and all-weather horses that had more opportunities beyond dirt than ever before; in 1991, Danzig needed significant main-track runners–like Dance Smartly, the Canadian Triple Crown and Breeders’ Cup Distaff winner that season, when she was also named Horse of the Year in Canada and champion 3-year-old filly in the U.S.–to land the sire championship.

“I think what everyone wants, if possible, is a versatile horse that can get both dirt and turf,” said Duncan Taylor of Taylor Made Farm, which stands three young stallions in California Chrome, Mshawish, and Midnight Storm that were successful on the two surfaces. “We were lucky we got horses that could run on both, and we like that they could run on both, but we didn’t go out consciously looking for turf. We got the best horses we could find. But we think people want a versatile horse.”

That versatility was best exemplified in 2017 by Darley’s Medaglia d’Oro, the sire of Mshawish–who won the GI Gulfstream Park Turf H. at five and the GI Donn H. on dirt at six. Like Kitten’s Joy and Artie Schiller, Medaglia d’Oro is a son of the imported El Prado (Ire), a European-raced son of Sadler’s Wells. El Prado was the first son of Sadler’s Wells whose progeny transitioned to dirt in the U.S., and Medaglia d’Oro, himself a dirt horse, has continued the duality that El Prado established as a sire of dirt and turf horses. At the Breeders’ Cup, for instance, he was represented by Talismanic, winner of the GI Turf, and Bar of Gold, first in the GI Filly and Mare Sprint. In short, he gets 2-year-olds, classic horses, and older runners, and they act on all surfaces. He’s the model of versatility at the top end of the market and as such his sons–even some foreign-bred ones–are getting their chances at stud in Kentucky.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/in ... -the-breed
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Sparrow Castle
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Sun Aug 12, 2018 11:41 pm

How Juddmonte Managed Arrogate's First Book
The lessons Juddmonte Farms learned from the first mares bred to Empire Maker and Aptitude have put its new sire and champion Arrogate on a better path toward early success, according to the farm's manager, Garrett O'Rourke.

"With Arrogate, we've set about showing what we've learned," said O'Rourke. "We made sure he had a nice blend of quality mares, those of the caliber to produce the type of runners similar to what he was—a classic, American dirt runner.

"We used a certain percentage of turf mares, but we went heavier than we did in the past on good dirt mares. We even went out and bought some precocious speed mares to bolster his chances of getting early runners," he said.
More: https://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing ... first-book
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Treve
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Tue Aug 14, 2018 12:23 am

I hope they also favoured mares with nice wide sloping open shoulders and good leg angulation. From what I recall those areas are his greatest physical weaknesses.
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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Mylute
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Thu Aug 23, 2018 9:57 pm

Thompson, Jones Hit With Normandy Invasion Filly In Memory Of Brenda Jones

https://www.paulickreport.com/news/bloo ... nda-jones/
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carole
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Sat Aug 25, 2018 5:11 pm

'Fairytale stuff'-Pat Downes on the rise and rise of Sea The Stars at stud
https://www.racingpost.com/bloodstock/b ... tud/343707
What reinforces a standout year for Sea The Stars is that, having not thus far been noted as a source of precocity, he has fared better in that department this summer.

He has five two-year-old winners to his name from his 2016 crop, including Layaleena, who triumphed on debut at Newmarket for Sir Michael Stoute on Friday; Fox Tal, a close fourth in the Listed Stonehenge Stakes at Salisbury later that day; and Star Terms, who has won her last two starts for Richard Hannon.

“Sea The Stars always gets those nice juvenile winners towards the end of the season, but this year we appear to be seeing some earlier types than in other years,” says Downes. “We're in August and we've already seen several smart performances.

“It's good to see, because I think as far as his own profile goes, that's the final piece of the jigsaw.”
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Sep 21, 2018 1:45 am

Project Underway To Analyze DNA From Seabiscuit
Seabiscuit was not an impressive looking horse and was considered to be quite lazy, preferring eating and sleeping to exercise. The horse had been written off by most of the racing industry after losing his first 17 races, however, he eventually became one of the greatest Thoroughbred champions of all time.

The grandson of Man o' War, Seabiscuit raised the hopes and spirits of a beleaguered nation during the Great Depression with a series of unlikely victories. Nov. 1st, 2018 marks the 80th Anniversary of his legendary win in a match race against Triple Crown winner War Admiral at Pimlico in 1938. The race drew 40,000 spectators, an enormous crowd in those days, and was broadcast by radio to President Franklin Roosevelt and 40 million other listeners across the country. Considered a West Coast underdog, Seabiscuit inspired America with his awe-inspiring win against all odds, but what made this crooked legged, supposed lazy horse a champion?

This and other questions led to an exciting collaboration between molecular geneticist Dr. Steven Tammariello, the Director of the Institute for Equine Genomics at Binghamton University (NY), Jacqueline Cooper, Seabiscuit Heritage Foundation President Emeritus and Col. Michael Howard, US Marines (Ret.), the great-grandson of Seabiscuit's owner, Charles S. Howard. The study, however, began not with Seabiscuit himself, but with one of his descendants.

Dr. Tammariello was initially contacted by Cooper, a private Thoroughbred breeder, who owns Seabiscuit's descendants stabled at historic Ridgewood Ranch, the home and final resting place of the champion, located in the oak and redwood-studded ranch land and mountains of northern California. Seabiscuit stood at stud there and was nursed back to health, after sustaining serious injury at age seven. His recuperation at Ridgewood set the stage for an electrifying blaze-of-glory career finish at Santa Anita Park that captivated Depression-era America.

At Cooper's request, Dr. Tammariello initially tested a 5x descendant of Seabiscuit, Bronze Sea, on a genetic panel that can be used to predict a horse's racing potential, giving rise to a question of a comparison between the DNA of the horse and its famous ancestor. This could only work if DNA from Seabiscuit still existed — an unlikely proposition since he died in 1947, explained Tammariello.

Obtaining a sample of Seabiscuit's DNA was made possible in a joint effort between the Seabiscuit Heritage Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to historic preservation and land conservation at Ridgewood Ranch, and the California Thoroughbred Foundation where Seabiscuit's silvered hooves, originally loaned by Marcela Howard, are currently on display. Although not common practice today, historically it was customary to remove the hooves of a champion racehorse as a keepsake prior to burial. Howard family historian, Col. Howard, agreed that an attempt could be made to extract the champion's DNA from the hooves and attested they are authentic.

Tammariello and PhD student Kate DeRosa, with assistance from Dr. Andy Merriwether, Professor of Anthropology and the Director of the Ancient DNA and Forensic Laboratory at Binghamton University, successfully isolated DNA from the coffin bone inside of two of the hoof capsules. Analysis of the samples revealed that the nuclear DNA is somewhat degraded, most likely due to the age of the hooves, or because of the harsh chemical treatment during the silvering process. However, the mitochondrial DNA is intact and was used to verify that the DNA extracted from each hoof is from the maternal family line 5-j. This, coupled with Col Howard's historical connection to the hooves, suggests the DNA extracted is indeed from Seabiscuit.

Though the nuclear DNA was significantly degraded, Tammariello and DeRosa were still able to partially sequence specific genes associated with optimal racing distance in Thoroughbreds. Seabiscuit was found to have gene variants often observed in horses that have a strong route-running ability, however underlying this were variants in minor racing genes that are normally found in sprinting horses. This somewhat rare genetic combination of stamina and speed seems to be reflected in the champion's race record, as he won races from 5 furlongs to 1 ¼ miles. Further, horses with this genotype today tend to be late developing, winning their first race almost three months later (on average) than horses with a genotype of precocity.
More: https://www.paulickreport.com/horse-car ... seabiscuit
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Mylute
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Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:55 am

Connections: 26-Year-old Breeder Defeates 70-1 Odds

https://www.paulickreport.com/features/ ... 70-1-odds/

~ Uplifting piece about the small breeding operation that produced the handsome Knicks Go.
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:42 pm

For the first time, I bought into a yearling at the sales this year. There's a lot to learn when venturing into that area of the industry.

Hagyard Veterinarian Interview Reveals Questions About Manipulated X-Rays, Radiograph Reports
As the Kentucky Board of Veterinary Examiners (KBVE) considers what its next steps will be in the case of a dozen veterinarians who self-reported for modifying dates on radiographs, one surgeon's testimony before the board raises questions about the practice of vetting horses at sale.

Earlier this year, 12 veterinarians at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky. reported themselves to the Board – some for altering dates on pre-sale radiographs bound for the repository at public auction, some for being aware the misdating was happening. The misdating came to light as part of an ongoing civil lawsuit between three Hagyard field care veterinarians and Hagyard partners over a deal to buy into the company.

The KBVE conducted interviews with the veterinarians who self-reported, as well as staff members at Hagyard to learn more about whether those vets were guilty of rule violations. Transcripts of those interviews, which are part of the public record, were recently uploaded onto the Kentucky Department of Agriculture's website.
More: https://www.paulickreport.com/news/ray- ... h-reports/
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Treve
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Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:49 pm

Congrats on the purchase would love to know more!
But ugh that is discouraging even if not altogether surprising...
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:10 pm

Treve wrote:
Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:49 pm
Congrats on the purchase would love to know more!
But ugh that is discouraging even if not altogether surprising...
Thanks! We had our vet scan/examine her and he found a spot of calcification. He thought if we could get her cheap enough, we could take a chance with it (there were a few other babies our trainer was considering). I’m sure we’re not the only ones who found or heard about it because the bidding really stalled. We got her at less than half her stud’s fee, maybe good for us but not so good for the breeders.

I learned later that there were people dissing the breeders, saying things like their babies are wild because they’re never handled and other dumb stuff. I realize that keeping the liquor flowing can help sales prices, but it also makes people be stupid. It just doesn’t seem to me like the proper time for drinking, not until you’ve gotten your business done.

Our filly looked and acted very different after we got her back to the farm. She's quite entertaining and energetic, very friendly, and is already bossing around the colts in the paddock next door. She really is a sweet baby, and we’re having fun with her.

Our trainer was VERY particular about which specific person was going to “break” her (didn't know how much that mattered). She’s been ridden for the last few days now, but she wasn’t so sure about it at first. We’re also trying to teach her that peppermints and carrots are yummy treats!

It’s a very different experience starting with a yearling and our journey’s just begun. Y’all with more sales and yearling experiences can disagree with my impressions so far, or maybe this is all second nature to you. But three big takeaways for newcomer me: Buyer Beware, Stay Off the Booze, Keep Your Cards Close to Your Vest. I suppose I could add a fourth, Keep Your Ears Open, with skepticism intact.
BaroqueAgain1
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Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:36 pm

IMHO, 'Buyer Beware, Stay Off the Booze, Keep Your Cards Close to Your Vest & Keep Your Ears Open' is good advice no matter what you're buying. ;)
lurkey mclurker
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Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:41 pm

Sparrow Castle wrote:
Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:10 pm


Our trainer was VERY particular about which specific person was going to “break” her (didn't know how much that mattered). She’s been ridden for the last few days now, but she wasn’t so sure about it at first. We’re also trying to teach her that peppermints and carrots are yummy treats!
LOL I'm helping start a three-year-old very smart 3/4 Morgan filly and after her uneventful first ride (she turned her head, looked at me, looked back down the arena rail and just walked on) she decided for her second ride that she would lie down in the middle of the arena. With me on her, of course. :lol:
BaroqueAgain1
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Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:17 pm

"...she decided for her second ride that she would lie down in the middle of the arena. With me on her, of course. "

How passive-aggressive. :P :lol:
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Sparrow Castle
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Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:22 pm

lurkey mclurker wrote:
Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:41 pm
Sparrow Castle wrote:
Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:10 pm


Our trainer was VERY particular about which specific person was going to “break” her (didn't know how much that mattered). She’s been ridden for the last few days now, but she wasn’t so sure about it at first. We’re also trying to teach her that peppermints and carrots are yummy treats!
LOL I'm helping start a three-year-old very smart 3/4 Morgan filly and after her uneventful first ride (she turned her head, looked at me, looked back down the arena rail and just walked on) she decided for her second ride that she would lie down in the middle of the arena. With me on her, of course. :lol:
That's hilarious! Our filly just kept looking back at her rider and didn't want to move forward. It was like she was wondering what he thought he was doing back there. She was also a little vocal. He was okay with just sitting on her until she was ready to move, which she did eventually.
lurkey mclurker
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Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:30 pm

Yeah our filly was totally calm & fine and she had been walking and stretching her neck down on a long rein, so at first I thought nothing of it - fortunately she went down soooo slowly and carefully that I figured out what was going on and by the time she was down I was standing next to her, blocking her back so she couldn't roll. I just didn't want her to break the tree on my saddle, LOL... she got right back up when I urged her and looked at me like, what? This is where I usually roll! :lol:
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Mylute
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Sat Nov 03, 2018 10:30 am

Get To Know Sabrina Moore, Breeder of Knicks Go

https://www.americasbestracing.net/life ... -knicks-go
"You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it."
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Sparrow Castle
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Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:38 pm

Two Classic Winners Make Ingordo Hungrier for the Next
Alpha to omega, A to Z: few men can have achieved as exhaustive a grasp as David Ingordo of what turns an unbroken Thoroughbred into a champion. Or make that Z to A. For in Zenyatta (Street Cry {Ire}) and now Accelerate (Lookin At Lucky), an agent who is still only 42 can be credited with finding two Breeders’ Cup Classic winners as yearlings in nine years.

Zenyatta he famously picked out for just $60,000; Accelerate, also at the Keeneland September Sale, for $380,000. Anyone familiar with this intense and driven figure, his eyes burning into the raw animal before him, will acknowledge the professionalism that yielded these discoveries. But that does not alter the fact that both were made for people he views more or less as family–and whose joy duly compounded Ingordo’s sense of fulfilment, in business or career terms, with a highly personal satisfaction.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/tw ... -the-next/
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