Broodmare Stats/Production records

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Treve
Posts: 4404
Joined: Fri May 08, 2015 5:12 pm

Sun Mar 18, 2018 5:54 pm

This might be a little arcane as far as specific numbers go but I was wondering if there is a statistical average for a broodmare record? We know the majority of thoroughbreds born will not make it to the races and of those that do, the majority will not be winners, and of those who become winners an even smaller percentage will become Stakes winners, fewer still will become Graded stakes winners and only the elite will become G1 winners. With that in mind I think most people have reasonable expectations of broodmares (although I suppose for those who were spectacular runners those expectations can become a little disproportionate when they mix with hope).

So I was wondering what is the statistical average for a broodmare in terms of production record? What's an average broodmare record, vs a decent or good broodmare record? At what point does one consider a mare to be a blue hen? Do all or most of her offspring to race need to be winners? Do they need to be Blacktype earners? How many foals would one try with a broodmare before giving up on her as a producer? (or do you just keep trying with a different stallion until she's too old to safely foal?) Is a mare's production record judged more or less harshly relative to her pedigree and performance on the track? And more or less harshly relative to the stallions she's mated with?
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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Flanders
Posts: 2872
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:01 pm

Mon Mar 19, 2018 9:37 am

Treve wrote:This might be a little arcane as far as specific numbers go but I was wondering if there is a statistical average for a broodmare record? We know the majority of thoroughbreds born will not make it to the races and of those that do, the majority will not be winners, and of those who become winners an even smaller percentage will become Stakes winners, fewer still will become Graded stakes winners and only the elite will become G1 winners. With that in mind I think most people have reasonable expectations of broodmares (although I suppose for those who were spectacular runners those expectations can become a little disproportionate when they mix with hope).

So I was wondering what is the statistical average for a broodmare in terms of production record? What's an average broodmare record, vs a decent or good broodmare record? At what point does one consider a mare to be a blue hen? Do all or most of her offspring to race need to be winners? Do they need to be Blacktype earners? How many foals would one try with a broodmare before giving up on her as a producer? (or do you just keep trying with a different stallion until she's too old to safely foal?) Is a mare's production record judged more or less harshly relative to her pedigree and performance on the track? And more or less harshly relative to the stallions she's mated with?
I've looked for something like this before with no luck. I know I read an article about it years ago but it was most likely in a paper copy of either Bloodhorse or Thoroughbred Times.
Of the little I was able to find without doing massive research, about 3% of broodmares become stakes producers, meaning they produce a stakes winner or placer.
Stakes winning/placing mares are more likely to produce a stakes horse, regardless of pedigree.
You might find this interesting: https://www.thoroughbredreview.com/the- ... le-family/

Blue Hen to me is a mare who produces numerous stakes winners who then have an impact themselves when they go on to their stud or broodmare careers.
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Treve
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Joined: Fri May 08, 2015 5:12 pm

Mon Mar 19, 2018 7:07 pm

Thanks Flanders! That was an interesting read. So in an ideal situation you want a broodmare that has a strong family, but who herself was a stakes horse, right :D
It is quite funny when taking this in account, then, that the popular myth seems to think that great race mares don't produce well. (But I think this may be a case of people's judgment being disproportionate to their expectations... It's harder to reproduce, let alone improve on a great horse).
The Japanese seem to have adopted the performance wisdom...
It's also funny that our latest Triple Crown winner is out of a mare who ran twice and never hit the board... and that of her 4 starters, all are winners and 3 are stakes horses/blacktype earners.
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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