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Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:55 pm
by BaroqueAgain1
163, Tammy the Torpedo, should be attractive to someone like Coolmore. A winning More Than Ready mare in foal to War Front? ;) And she's really pretty.
$1,650,000.
ETA: She sold to Dr. Masatake Iida. Anyone familiar with who this is?

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:51 pm
by TapitsGal
Anyone know who bought life at ten and criminologist

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:37 pm
by starrydreamer
TapitsGal wrote:Anyone know who bought life at ten and criminologist


Life at Ten bought by SF Bloodstock, which has horses in the US, UK, Ireland, France, and Australia.

Criminologist bought by Brushy Hill Equine.

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:09 pm
by Ballerina
mosieposie12 wrote:Coolmore got her will be bred to American Pharoah


Nicks out to a C. Guess one can't always go by a nicking system.

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:59 pm
by Treve
Ballerina wrote:
mosieposie12 wrote:Coolmore got her will be bred to American Pharoah


Nicks out to a C. Guess one can't always go by a nicking system.


Well, Street Cry x Vertigineux was a D before Zenyatta was born, it's not perfect by any means :D

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:33 pm
by Macaroni
So, I am not too well-versed in the sales stuff, so this may be a dumb question, but can someone answer this for me:

Brian Graves purchased the weanling filly by American Pharoah o/o Life at Ten and in an interview said the following:

"We intend to re-sell her next year," said Graves. "We just thought she was a beautiful, balanced filly, and maybe one of the best in the sale. American Pharoahs have been selling well. She's out of a grade 1 winner and she's all class, so we'll take a shot."

What is the point of that? Is that not just a waste of money? I assume he's just taking a chance that for some reason he can re-sell her for a higher price than he purchased her for, but given the fact that at next year's sale, she and all the other AP foals will still only be yearlings, AP still won't have proven himself as a sire...nothing will change other than his foals will be bigger and conformationally slightly more defined. Am I wrong?

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:47 pm
by Ridan_Remembered
Macaroni wrote:So, I am not too well-versed in the sales stuff, so this may be a dumb question, but can someone answer this for me:

Brian Graves purchased the weanling filly by American Pharoah o/o Life at Ten and in an interview said the following:

"We intend to re-sell her next year," said Graves...American Pharoahs have been selling well. She's out of a grade 1 winner and she's all class, so we'll take a shot."

What is the point of that?


It's called pin-hooking and is pretty common on the commercial side of breeding. If the filly continues to develop nicely, he stands to make a profit. Pin-hookers have to balance the purchase price for and care of the weanling for about a year against the potential yearling sales price. They have to hope nothing happens to the weanling in that year, too. It's a bonus if any relatives of the weanling win stakes and enhance the weanling's catalog page. There must be potential profit in it because, as mentioned, pin-hooking is pretty common.

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:56 pm
by Macaroni
Ridan_Remembered wrote:
Macaroni wrote:So, I am not too well-versed in the sales stuff, so this may be a dumb question, but can someone answer this for me:

Brian Graves purchased the weanling filly by American Pharoah o/o Life at Ten and in an interview said the following:

"We intend to re-sell her next year," said Graves...American Pharoahs have been selling well. She's out of a grade 1 winner and she's all class, so we'll take a shot."

What is the point of that?


It's called pin-hooking and is pretty common on the commercial side of breeding. If the filly continues to develop nicely, he stands to make a profit. Pin-hookers have to balance the purchase price for and care of the weanling for about a year against the potential yearling sales price. They have to hope nothing happens to the weanling in that year, too. It's a bonus if any relatives of the weanling win stakes and enhance the weanling's catalog page. There must be potential profit in it because, as mentioned, pin-hooking is pretty common.


Whew, that seems...super risky. But I guess it must pay off if it's so common. Thanks for the explanation! :)

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 9:08 pm
by Ridan_Remembered
Macaroni wrote:Whew, that seems...super risky. But I guess it must pay off if it's so common. Thanks for the explanation! :)


You're very welcome. Oh, by the way, no question is "dumb" to me. If you want additional info, here's a good article from The Paulick Report: https://www.paulickreport.com/news/ray- ... pinhooking

Re: 2017 Keeneland November Sale

PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:11 pm
by Treve
Macaroni wrote:
Ridan_Remembered wrote:
Macaroni wrote:So, I am not too well-versed in the sales stuff, so this may be a dumb question, but can someone answer this for me:

Brian Graves purchased the weanling filly by American Pharoah o/o Life at Ten and in an interview said the following:

"We intend to re-sell her next year," said Graves...American Pharoahs have been selling well. She's out of a grade 1 winner and she's all class, so we'll take a shot."

What is the point of that?


It's called pin-hooking and is pretty common on the commercial side of breeding. If the filly continues to develop nicely, he stands to make a profit. Pin-hookers have to balance the purchase price for and care of the weanling for about a year against the potential yearling sales price. They have to hope nothing happens to the weanling in that year, too. It's a bonus if any relatives of the weanling win stakes and enhance the weanling's catalog page. There must be potential profit in it because, as mentioned, pin-hooking is pretty common.


Whew, that seems...super risky. But I guess it must pay off if it's so common. Thanks for the explanation! :)


It can be risky but if you look at the Cairo Prince weanlings that were bought last year, then look at his yearling sales this year, whoever bothered to pinhook a yearling or two probably hit a home run.