Keeneland September (12-25) Yearling Sale

BaroqueAgain1
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Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:16 pm

Mon Sep 26, 2016 2:57 pm

At least Raison d'Etat (A.P. Indy - Sightseek) has a fine pedigree. Not a bad-looking horse, although no race record to speak of. And his legs look kinda lumpy in this conformation photo.
http://www.bloodhorse.com/stallion-regi ... ison-detat
Don't know if it's just the photo or he has a bunch of dings.
Too bad Cape Blanco, a Galileo with an excellent race record, didn't do well. I don't know if any Galileos have succeeded here.
IIRC, the only Sadler's Wells-line stallion who has made an impact in this country is El Prado...but WHAT an impact.
BaroqueAgain1
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Mon Sep 26, 2016 6:35 pm

And who is breeding to Snapy Halo and trying to sell them?

Funny you should mention him. ;)
TVG's Nick Hines, who just got back from the Keeneland sales, was asked about new sires in an email. He liked the Orbs, was part of the purchase of a Point of Entry...and also mentioned 'a stallion you've probably never heard of,' Snapy Halo. He's a South American, G1-winning son of Southern Halo and Calumet stands him.
http://www.bloodhorse.com/stallion-regi ... y-halo-arg
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bare it all
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Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:08 pm

BaroqueAgain1 wrote:And who is breeding to Snapy Halo and trying to sell them?

Funny you should mention him. ;)
TVG's Nick Hines, who just got back from the Keeneland sales, was asked about new sires in an email. He liked the Orbs, was part of the purchase of a Point of Entry...and also mentioned 'a stallion you've probably never heard of,' Snapy Halo. He's a South American, G1-winning son of Southern Halo and Calumet stands him.
http://www.bloodhorse.com/stallion-regi ... y-halo-arg
I think i was just more surprised to see so many of them attempting to sell. They obviously don't look like much because no one was willing to pay much if anything for them. $7500 stud fee is a little much, but maybe they'll hit the track and be runners.
BlindLucky
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Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:52 pm

bare it all wrote:Just looking through results based on stallions...
I'll say that our partnership bought a Gemologist filly last year at the sale and liked her so much, they bought a Gemologist colt at this year's sale. The filly is strong, precocious, and is 1 for 1 on the track so far. They both look like identical clone stamps of their sire, it's kinda crazy--and I always thought he was a nice looking horse.
Photos from my racing travels: ThoroughbredJourney.com
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Sparrow Castle
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Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:38 pm

Reserve Prices and Post-Sale Deals
Keeneland reported there were 1,006 yearlings that went unsold at the September yearling sale, for an RNA rate of 26.5%. In reality, the RNA rate was considerably lower due to the large number of horses sold after they left the ring.

Consignors at the September sale reported brisk RNA sale activity, with as many as 50% of their buybacks being sold before leaving the grounds. Unlike some sales companies, Keeneland does not include the post-sale transactions in its official results, but does have an "RNA to Sale" section where they post sales reported by consignors after the fact.

Post-sale deals—many times occurring at the barn not long after a horse left the ring unsold—have always been a part of the public auction process. Since a consignor's primary goal is to get the horse sold on behalf of the owner, they usually are receptive to after-sale offers.

But some consignors are frustrated by what they say is a proliferation of such activity in recent years. It is not uncommon for a potential buyer to elicit the reserve price from the seller, and armed with that information, not bid while the animal is in the sales ring. They are then quick to show up at the barn, haggling for a deal.
More: http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/ ... sale-deals

The RNA to Sale info will be posted here eventually: http://www.keeneland.com/sales/rna-sale-reports
Mel Mae
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Tue Sep 27, 2016 7:38 pm

bare it all wrote: Keep Up (Unbridleds Song x Keeper Hill) had a nice trio sell... 17k, 12k, 35k
I was skeptical of Keep Up when he retired but I've seen two of them (one in July, one here) that were fairly nice. I don't know that he'll ever get the support to be even half the sire the last resident of the stall he's in (when I was there a year or so ago, he was in Gone West's stall) was but I won't be surprised if he turns into a useful type.
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:00 pm

Notable private sales from the Keeneland September yearling sale
Hip 47, gr. or ro. c. Tapit--Spring Free, by Royal Academy
Buyer: Cobra Farm, $425,000 (Hammer Price: $425,000)

Hip 75, b. c., War Front--Sun Shower, by Indian Ridge
Buyer: Randy Bradshaw, $75,000 ($95,000)
Half to Excelebration, Mull of Killough

Hip 107, b. f., War Front--Turbulent Descent, by Congrats
Buyer: Quarterpole Enterprises, $200,000 ($185,000)

Hip 151, b. c., Medaglia d'Oro--Achieving, by Bernardini
Buyer: Christina Jelm, agent, $500,000 ($500,000)

Hip 152, dk. b. or br. c., Street Cry--Acquileia, by Arch
Buyer: Ben Glass, agent, $500,000 ($525,000)

Hip 309, b. c., Medaglia d'Oro--Double Tapped, by Tapit
Buyer: Shawn Dugan Drysdale, agent for David Heerensperger, $250,000 ($225,000)

Hip 466, b. f., War Front--Louve des Reves, by Sadler's Wells
Buyer: Mark Stanley, $180,000 ($180,000)
Full to G3P Omar Bradley

Hip 471, b. f., Galileo--Luas Line, by Danehill
Buyer: Hugo Lascelles, agent, $100,000 ($95,000)
http://live.drf.com/nuggets/32870

Full list: http://www.keeneland.com/sites/default/ ... ep2016.pdf
Lord Helpus
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Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:44 pm

Ziggypop wrote:
Lord Helpus wrote:Sometimes the one bid horses are the consignor or the consignor's friend bidding to a) get the bidding started or 2) bring the horse home again so the meat men will not try to negotiate for the horse.

I have taken home several "no bids". Often the sellers are grateful to have it go to a good home. One I took home was later "World Champion" at the Quarter Horse Congress in English Pleasure (no, I have no idea how a TB qualifies for Congress, but I was sent the picture of the horse with all the swag around him and the huge ribbon around his neck).

The other one became a famous (in its circle) polo pony and was bought by Argentine polo players for $50,000.

The first one got no bids because he was really back at the knees. But that is what made him such an incredible mover and he has stayed sound for at least 14 years by only doing very slow walk, jog and lope. The second one was small and had an ugly ewe neck; polo players think both traits are a plus.

I am sure that some of them come to bad ends, but they are not throw away horses just because they are not wanted in the racing world.
So kill buyers hang around these sales?
No, they don't hang around the sales (as they do at New Holland and other very low $$ auctions). But I have known "buyers" contacting sellers/owners after the sale and promise to give the horse a good home. Yeah.....

Of the 2 I got, one was free and the other was $1000 -- I did not make much money (maybe $1500 each) when I sold them on, after 2 years and breaking them, but I felt good about it.

I also was the only bidder for another colt. He was very cute and when I saw he had no bids, I put my hand up at $1000. THEN I go to look at him.... He had a horrible club foot. I gave him away within 30 minutes to the guy who had worked the horse's consignment and who had fallen in love with the colt. He was deliriously excited to be able to own him. Live and Learn. Actually I didn't (learn). I bought another colt at a private (foreclosure) auction. He was by More Than Ready out of a good dam. "How could I lose money?" I thought. Well, I almost broke even, :) selling him at the very end of the Sept sale. He went to a good local trainer at CD and won a few races.
Ziggypop
Posts: 455
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Wed Oct 05, 2016 10:33 pm

Lord Helpus wrote:
Ziggypop wrote:
Lord Helpus wrote:Sometimes the one bid horses are the consignor or the consignor's friend bidding to a) get the bidding started or 2) bring the horse home again so the meat men will not try to negotiate for the horse.

I have taken home several "no bids". Often the sellers are grateful to have it go to a good home. One I took home was later "World Champion" at the Quarter Horse Congress in English Pleasure (no, I have no idea how a TB qualifies for Congress, but I was sent the picture of the horse with all the swag around him and the huge ribbon around his neck).

The other one became a famous (in its circle) polo pony and was bought by Argentine polo players for $50,000.

The first one got no bids because he was really back at the knees. But that is what made him such an incredible mover and he has stayed sound for at least 14 years by only doing very slow walk, jog and lope. The second one was small and had an ugly ewe neck; polo players think both traits are a plus.

I am sure that some of them come to bad ends, but they are not throw away horses just because they are not wanted in the racing world.
So kill buyers hang around these sales?
No, they don't hang around the sales (as they do at New Holland and other very low $$ auctions). But I have known "buyers" contacting sellers/owners after the sale and promise to give the horse a good home. Yeah.....

Of the 2 I got, one was free and the other was $1000 -- I did not make much money (maybe $1500 each) when I sold them on, after 2 years and breaking them, but I felt good about it.

I also was the only bidder for another colt. He was very cute and when I saw he had no bids, I put my hand up at $1000. THEN I go to look at him.... He had a horrible club foot. I gave him away within 30 minutes to the guy who had worked the horse's consignment and who had fallen in love with the colt. He was deliriously excited to be able to own him. Live and Learn. Actually I didn't (learn). I bought another colt at a private (foreclosure) auction. He was by More Than Ready out of a good dam. "How could I lose money?" I thought. Well, I almost broke even, :) selling him at the very end of the Sept sale. He went to a good local trainer at CD and won a few races.
Thank you for letting me know. And a really big thank you for looking out for those who no one will give a chance.
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Treve
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Thu Oct 06, 2016 2:08 pm

Lord Helpus wrote:
Ziggypop wrote:
Lord Helpus wrote:Sometimes the one bid horses are the consignor or the consignor's friend bidding to a) get the bidding started or 2) bring the horse home again so the meat men will not try to negotiate for the horse.

I have taken home several "no bids". Often the sellers are grateful to have it go to a good home. One I took home was later "World Champion" at the Quarter Horse Congress in English Pleasure (no, I have no idea how a TB qualifies for Congress, but I was sent the picture of the horse with all the swag around him and the huge ribbon around his neck).

The other one became a famous (in its circle) polo pony and was bought by Argentine polo players for $50,000.

The first one got no bids because he was really back at the knees. But that is what made him such an incredible mover and he has stayed sound for at least 14 years by only doing very slow walk, jog and lope. The second one was small and had an ugly ewe neck; polo players think both traits are a plus.

I am sure that some of them come to bad ends, but they are not throw away horses just because they are not wanted in the racing world.
So kill buyers hang around these sales?
No, they don't hang around the sales (as they do at New Holland and other very low $$ auctions). But I have known "buyers" contacting sellers/owners after the sale and promise to give the horse a good home. Yeah.....

Of the 2 I got, one was free and the other was $1000 -- I did not make much money (maybe $1500 each) when I sold them on, after 2 years and breaking them, but I felt good about it.

I also was the only bidder for another colt. He was very cute and when I saw he had no bids, I put my hand up at $1000. THEN I go to look at him.... He had a horrible club foot. I gave him away within 30 minutes to the guy who had worked the horse's consignment and who had fallen in love with the colt. He was deliriously excited to be able to own him. Live and Learn. Actually I didn't (learn). I bought another colt at a private (foreclosure) auction. He was by More Than Ready out of a good dam. "How could I lose money?" I thought. Well, I almost broke even, :) selling him at the very end of the Sept sale. He went to a good local trainer at CD and won a few races.
The story of the club-footed colt made me smile. The fact the guy who worked his consignment fell in love with him looking past his flaw makes the ice around my heart melt a little ;)
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
Sipekel
Posts: 1
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Fri Sep 28, 2018 2:08 pm

BlindLuckypost_id=14907ime=1474653827 wrote:
bare it all wrote:Another RNA-0 popped up and this one makes me sad.
Raison d'Etat x Colonial Empress (the filly that Wayne Lukas ran in the KY Oaks as a maiden in 2012) had her filly RNA at $1k. At least she got one bid, I guess? I even felt sorry for Colonial Empress on the track. She raced 13 times in 11 months with 1 win--she broke her maiden in her 11th start.
Sadly this filly was a RNA but.... Im happy she landed with me!!! She was purchase as a RNA for actually less then the reserve. I see many reasons why they let her go cheap. Will she be racing, honestly I don't know. She was broke by my at the time 11 year old daughter. She was very sweet and fun. Now as shes gotten older she bites and kicks. I assume that came from the momma. The unique story this filly has which must have been why she landed with me. I am from VA. So with that said, this filly ended up running the same fields at Pleasant Colony for a bit. The barn manager there actually use to work at Spring Hill Farm where the female lines grew up. Pretty cool I think. The odds of that are pretty slim. For her current state her name is Raison d'pol which I think should have been Destructive d'pol because she destroys everything and breaks out of her stall and goes as she pleases at times. She bites, she kicks, shes a total dream to ride though. With her kicking sadly she did mess up her hock a bit and has some fluid on it. She is not lame and still quick as she was prior to the kicking incident. She will continue to go back in to race training on the farm until January and maybe by spring she will get her first start. She would have started sooner but the trainer wanted to give her time to grow as the linage on her speaks for it itself as later runners. But no worries whether she hits the track or not shes in awesome hands and will be with me until the end. I tried to attach pics of her but they were too large. If anyone wants to keep in touch and follow her journey I am open to that.
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