The WAR HORSE Chronicles

WaquoitNBroadBrush
Posts: 1092
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 10:22 am

Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:27 pm

WarBiscuit wrote:
Bell Zone - 10g (3 Races in 5 days!).
In the Long Strange Trip Department: I'd like to know how this Richard Bell homebred went from breaking maiden at Del Mar in 2010 to running three times in five days at Black Foot!
WarBiscuit
Posts: 1263
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:40 pm
Location: Mount Clemens, MI / Hawks Nest, WV

Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:33 pm

WaquoitNBroadBrush wrote:
WarBiscuit wrote:
Bell Zone - 10g (3 Races in 5 days!).
In the Long Strange Trip Department: I'd like to know how this Richard Bell homebred went from breaking maiden at Del Mar in 2010 to running three times in five days at Black Foot!
Interesting, isn't it? Can be somewhat disturbing, as well. Falling down the ladder due to lack of competitiveness is a familiar story with many of these elderly runners. I don't know how Bell Zone ended up where he is - other than being just a victim of the mechanics of the low end of the sport. I was reading just today about another 10yo runner that has been mentioned on this thread a number of times, Becky's Kitten, a Ramsey horse (in case you didn't guess). Broke his maiden at Saratoga, been with more trainers than you can shake a stick at including Asmussen, Ward, Maker and a ton of unrecognizable names, tossed around like a rag doll, and finally ending up at Camarero where he continues to run in cheap claimers (125 starts to date). Makes me wonder if Mr. Ramsey keeps track of his old horses that still struggle on , and with all of the recent trouble in Puerto Rico and many of these animals now extremely desperate for food, if any attempt is made to help this Kittens Joy son out a bit? Just curious.

Many of these older horses that I continue to list here as winners are obviously well taken care of, resulting in their still being in decent shape on the track. But, I know all too well that a lot of them are in deep trouble. After all, to many of these low rent trainers - they are just horses. If you wreck one, you just get another, right?...

WarBiscuit
"One horse-laugh is worth ten thousand syllogisms. It is not only more effective; it is also vastly more intelligent." H.L. Mencken
WaquoitNBroadBrush
Posts: 1092
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 10:22 am

Fri Sep 22, 2017 6:36 pm

WarBiscuit wrote:
WaquoitNBroadBrush wrote:
WarBiscuit wrote:
Bell Zone - 10g (3 Races in 5 days!).
In the Long Strange Trip Department: I'd like to know how this Richard Bell homebred went from breaking maiden at Del Mar in 2010 to running three times in five days at Black Foot!
Interesting, isn't it? Can be somewhat disturbing, as well. Falling down the ladder due to lack of competitiveness is a familiar story with many of these elderly runners. I don't know how Bell Zone ended up where he is - other than being just a victim of the mechanics of the low end of the sport. I was reading just today about another 10yo runner that has been mentioned on this thread a number of times, Becky's Kitten, a Ramsey horse (in case you didn't guess). Broke his maiden at Saratoga, been with more trainers than you can shake a stick at including Asmussen, Ward, Maker and a ton of unrecognizable names, tossed around like a rag doll, and finally ending up at Camarero where he continues to run in cheap claimers (125 starts to date). Makes me wonder if Mr. Ramsey keeps track of his old horses that still struggle on , and with all of the recent trouble in Puerto Rico and many of these animals now extremely desperate for food, if any attempt is made to help this Kittens Joy son out a bit? Just curious.

Many of these older horses that I continue to list here as winners are obviously well taken care of, resulting in their still being in decent shape on the track. But, I know all too well that a lot of them are in deep trouble. After all, to many of these low rent trainers - they are just horses. If you wreck one, you just get another, right?...

WarBiscuit
Two words: Dale Baird.

I looked up a couple of the horses Bell Zone beat at Del Mar and they had career declines -- one to Golden Gate, the other to Canterbury -- but both are long retired. The Black Foot thing stood out because that's a Native American meet and most of the owners and trainers involved are Native American. Always wondered how thoroughbreds get to them.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:59 pm

Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc.
All 16 CTA retired racehorses are doing fine. Sadly, the Hipodromo Camarero racetrack was severely damaged by Hurricane Maria and communication is poor. Reports are there that none of the 800+ thoroughbreds at the track was killed, but there were some injuries (e.g., cuts and scrapes) that I’m told are being attended to. Many barns lost roofs, fencing, structures and trees came down, the facility flooded. Right now, the horses cannot leave their stalls because of heavy debris and flooding. They are standing in water and there is little water and hay. The people caring for the horses are doing the best they can in the circumstances. Also, there are efforts to get help from the States and Disaster Relief organizations. We will keep everyone posted with information as we learn it.
WarBiscuit
Posts: 1263
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:40 pm
Location: Mount Clemens, MI / Hawks Nest, WV

Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:20 pm

Sparrow Castle wrote:Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc.
All 16 CTA retired racehorses are doing fine. Sadly, the Hipodromo Camarero racetrack was severely damaged by Hurricane Maria and communication is poor. Reports are there that none of the 800+ thoroughbreds at the track was killed, but there were some injuries (e.g., cuts and scrapes) that I’m told are being attended to. Many barns lost roofs, fencing, structures and trees came down, the facility flooded. Right now, the horses cannot leave their stalls because of heavy debris and flooding. They are standing in water and there is little water and hay. The people caring for the horses are doing the best they can in the circumstances. Also, there are efforts to get help from the States and Disaster Relief organizations. We will keep everyone posted with information as we learn it.
Thanks much for the continued reports. What a horrific situation for these horses and their people. I'm sure that CTA is grateful beyond measure for any help that they can get. Please consider helping them, even if it is only pocket change as it all adds up to buy food and supplies. And if the weather GODS happen to be reading this, they have had enough down there.

WarBiscuit
"One horse-laugh is worth ten thousand syllogisms. It is not only more effective; it is also vastly more intelligent." H.L. Mencken
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:20 pm

WarBiscuit wrote:
Sparrow Castle wrote:Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc.
All 16 CTA retired racehorses are doing fine. Sadly, the Hipodromo Camarero racetrack was severely damaged by Hurricane Maria and communication is poor. Reports are there that none of the 800+ thoroughbreds at the track was killed, but there were some injuries (e.g., cuts and scrapes) that I’m told are being attended to. Many barns lost roofs, fencing, structures and trees came down, the facility flooded. Right now, the horses cannot leave their stalls because of heavy debris and flooding. They are standing in water and there is little water and hay. The people caring for the horses are doing the best they can in the circumstances. Also, there are efforts to get help from the States and Disaster Relief organizations. We will keep everyone posted with information as we learn it.
Thanks much for the continued reports. What a horrific situation for these horses and their people. I'm sure that CTA is grateful beyond measure for any help that they can get. Please consider helping them, even if it is only pocket change as it all adds up to buy food and supplies. And if the weather GODS happen to be reading this, they have had enough down there.

WarBiscuit
Yes, the task ahead is tremendous and every little bit helps. The Caribbean islands have been devastated, so much suffering, and so many people depend on tourism to make a living. I wonder how well and how quickly the TB industry, the people and horses within it, can recover under the circumstances.

There are many people I follow on FB and/or Twitter that haven't been heard from yet. And we don't know the fate of the many horses that are racing or rehomed on St. Thomas, St. Croix, and Tortola. But I know communication is still awful, and I continue to remain hopeful.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:08 am

Maria Leaves Puerto Rican Racing in Total Disarray
Image
The heavily damaged grandstand at Camarero Racetrack
Thoroughbred breeding and racing industry in Puerto Rico was not spared the brunt of Hurricane Maria, which roared through the American territory earlier this week, causing massive structural damage to Camarero Race Track some 30 kilometers southwest of central San Juan and as-yet undetermined damage to the region’s horse farms.

Puerto Rican Racing Commissioner Jose A. Maymo issued an update to industry stakeholders late in the evening of Sept. 21, spelling out the details as he knew them. Maymo explained in his update that he had the opportunity to visit the heavily damaged grandstand and barn area at Camarero, calling the stables “shattered” with “90% of the cages [stalls] without their roofs.” Maymo confirmed there were no equine or human deaths reported at the track. He assured Camarero owners and trainers that the racing commission could be counted upon “to coordinate everything related to food supplies and beds” for the horses.

Maymo added that the tote board also suffered damage, but that efforts would be made to maintain the racing surface so that the horses may be able to train. The grandstand and surrounding areas and the clubhouse were destroyed, Maymo wrote. He added that a rebuilding effort would take months, but that there was no timetable. Maymo sounded a hopeful note, saying that this event “is an opportunity for a new beginning, a resurgence of our equestrianism.”

Maymo also assured industry participants that the Racing Commission would attempt to make arrangements for any Puerto Rican horses being pointed for the Serie Hipica del Caribe at Gulfstream Park Saturday, Dec. 9, to be transferred to South Florida.

“We will do everything in our power to achieve it,” Maymo wrote. “Puerto Rico…deserves to be represented as a sign that we are standing and that we will be stronger than ever.”
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/ma ... -disarray/
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:37 pm

A Twitter message from Shelley (CTA co-director in FL) and pictures of Camarero:
Image
Image
Image
Image
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Sat Sep 23, 2017 2:20 pm

Letter to the Editor: Shelley Blodgett on Hurricane Maria
I am Shelley Blodgett, co-founder of Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc, a non-profit (501c3) that helps Thoroughbreds racing in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. I think there is a story that needs to get out.

There are 864 U.S. Thoroughbreds (all Jockey Club registered) stabled at Hipodromo Camarero Racetrack in Canóvanas, Puerto Rico. The racetrack, including the barns, was heavily damaged during Hurricane Maria. Further, the horses cannot leave their stalls due to debris, downed fencing and flooding. They are standing in water, and there is NO clean water or hay. I was told that they are giving them some grain (presumably without water). No horses died during the storm, but some needed stitches and such.

I learned this from a brief phone call from CTA co-founder, Kelley Stobie (the call was disconnected). She is at the track seven days a week, working as an equine therapist. She toured the track and spoke with the backstretch supervisor, some owners, trainer and vets. She told me the situation is dire and there is no way to get needed water, hay and medical supplies right now.

There is more to the story, but I’ll leave it at that for now. I’ve attached some photos I managed to get from the La Escuelita Hípica (the Jockey School at the track); they help with the track horses and posted this and have commented on the situation. Kelley also has photos, but cannot get them to me.

More than half of the Thoroughbreds in Puerto Rico were bred in the States. I have a line graph of numbers for both Puerto Rican-bred and U.S.-bred. There are some good horses there, including 2012 GI Belmont S. runner and 2013 Maxxam Gold Cup winner Unstoppable U, as well as Arch Traveler (who was also on the Triple Crown trail early in his career) and Becky’s Kitten. We gathered data and determined that 1,500 people have a stake in the racing industry in Puerto Rico (see pie chart). Thus, these horses are essential to the well being of many people in Puerto Rico.

I do not believe that there has been any formal request by the Puerto Rican government to help the horses at that time, but I have been working to rattle the bushes and get things moving. I have spoken with a veterinarian, who is an equine disaster response specialist and on the National Veterinary Response Team, but they cannot help until there is an official request to FEMA from the Puerto Rican government official. Also, I’ve spoken with the Secretary of Agriculture for U.S.V.I., Carlos Robles, but he has not been able to make contact with his counterpart in Puerto Rico, though I know he has sent him an email.

There are about 200 Thoroughbreds in St. Croix, including race horses and breeding farms, and there are 40 Thoroughbreds racing in St. Thomas and many OTTBs in rescue/aftercare as well. Mr. Robles is assessing the situation in U.S.V.I. and trying to initiate needed federal help down there. I have tried calling all of the CTA board members, which include a prominent breeder, an equine veterinarian and an attorney, but all cell service is out. Further, I’ve called the Racetrack Administrator, Jose Maymo, but his cell phone isn’t in service.

We really need the racing industry and other equine organizations in the States to help urgently as there is little time to waste. These horses survived the storm, but are facing dehydration, starvation and risk of secondary health issues (e.g., colic, infection) due to the environmental hazards and lack of basic needs. These are U.S. horses. They do their jobs faithfully as racehorses and deserve better. They support the livelihood of many in the islands. Thank You.
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/le ... Vg.twitter
WarBiscuit
Posts: 1263
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:40 pm
Location: Mount Clemens, MI / Hawks Nest, WV

Mon Sep 25, 2017 4:28 pm

Sounds like more help is on the way for Camarero horses.

http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/ ... t-camarero


WarBiscuit
"One horse-laugh is worth ten thousand syllogisms. It is not only more effective; it is also vastly more intelligent." H.L. Mencken
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:48 pm

At Least Four Horses Dead at Puerto Rico’s Camarero Racetrack
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 5:33 pm
By Bill Finley
The devastation in Puerto Rico caused by Hurricane Maria includes the islands’s racehorse population. According to Shelley Blodgett of Carribean Thoroughbred Aftercare, Inc, four fatalities have been confirmed among the horses on the backstretch of Camarero Racetrack. Blodgett said she fears when more information becomes available the death toll among horses at the racetrack will rise.

Blodgett has been receiving information from a volunteer from her organization, Kelley Stobie, who is in Puerto Rico and has been spending countless hours at the racetrack trying to assist horses in need. It is very difficult to get a cell phone call into or out of Puerto Rico, but Blodgett said Stobie has been resourceful and has managed to communicate with her on several occasions.

Having spoken to Stobie, Blodgett paints a grim picture of the scene at the racetrack, where she says several horses have been abandoned since the storm pelted Puerto Rico.

“A lot of things are in motion at the track, but things have been very hard and some of the horses have not gotten the attention that they need,” Blodgett said. “There is a lack of resources and many of the owners, trainers and grooms are not able to get to the track. Kelley has been there every day taking care of the 16 off-the-track Thoroughbreds we are caring for. Yesterday, she watered about 100 racehorses. With 10 horses she got to, she was literally pulling them out; they had literally not been touched since the hurricane. She was able to get them water. We have heard of four confirmed deaths, from founder and colic. Some connections have been hauling in water for their horses since day one and others have just been abandoned.”

When asked if there will likely be reports of more horse deaths, Blodgett replied: “I think there will. Some horses are just getting water now, but forage is still not readily available for some connections. Hay production is not up and running in Puerto Rico. Some of the horses are standing in muck up to their ankles. They are dehydrated. Some have raced a lot and there’s been wear and tear. Those ones are a little underweight to start with, so they have less reserves to deal with this.”

Including non-racehorses, there are about 950 horses on the Camarero backstretch.

Blodgett said that while many horsemen have done everything possible to get to the track and care for their horses, others have not made it a priority.

“One of the main problems there is that the care-givers have had their lives turned upside down,” said. “They may not have a means of getting to the track or they are busy dealing with their own lives. There are some owners who are just abandoning their horses and saying just let them be. They are going to worry about themselves first. But I don’t think that is the majority. These people are going through a crisis. I think they’ve depleted, their physical, mental and emotional reserves.”

The worst may be over as several groups, Carribean Thoroughbred Aftercare among them, have huddled and are working together to help solve the crisis. Other organizations include the Humane Society of the United States, the American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Association of Equine Practitioners, The Jockey Club and the United States Equestrian Federation. Blodgett said arrangements have been made to fly in pelletized hay, though it is unclear when it is going to arrive. She also said about 40 to 50 horses have been put into a quarantine facility and once cleared will be shipped to Miami. She said active racehorses are being given priority over all other horses when it comes to leaving the island.

Keith Kleine, a spokesperson for the AAEP, said that group has members in Puerto Rico that are helping and he believes, in time, volunteer vets from the continental U.S. will fly down to assist them. The biggest problem, he said, is finding a way to communicate with people in Puerto Rico. Kleine is looking in to purchasing satellite phones.

“This is still a work in progress and we still have to have some further assessments to make on the ground,” he said. “Those are short-term issues. There are needs like food and medical supplies. We have those. That’s the easy part. Getting access to the island and the ability to operate there is the challenging part.”

Kleine said the AAEP does not need supplies, but said financial contributions to the AAEP or any other organizations trying to help the horses of Puerto Rico are badly needed. Here is a list of groups you may wish to contribute to:
The AAEP’s charitable foundation
Carribean Thoroughbred Aftercare, Inc.
Humane Society of United States Disaster Relief Fund
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/at ... racetrack/
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:53 pm

To put the TDN comments in perspective:

Shelley Blodgett‏ @ShelleyBlodgett
Shelley Blodgett Retweeted CBS News
"Analysis Paralysis", acting NOW may lead 2 some supplies being squandered, but LIVES are being squandered (ppl r dying) by delaying action!

CBS News‏Verified account @CBSNews
"I know that leaders aren't supposed to cry...But we are having a humanitarian crisis here," San Juan mayor tells @DavidBegnaud
https://twitter.com/CBSNews/status/912689727513513985
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:47 pm

Kudos to Kelley and CTA! The horse lying down was colicking. Some of these horses are getting fresh water for the first time 6 days after the storm.

Shelley Blodgett‏ @ShelleyBlodgett
Kelley Stobie, co-founder @CaribbeanOTTB, is my HERO! Is volunteering @camareropr every day, helping horses w/o connections caring 4 them
Image
Image
Image
Image
BaroqueAgain1
Posts: 9532
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:16 pm

Wed Sep 27, 2017 11:17 pm

I wonder how that chestnut with Kelley is doing.
I can't help but fear that any horse who colicks there now is going to be at risk of dying without a lot of veterinarian/clinic intervention. So many of those horses' digestive tracks must be in near shutdown.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:57 am

BaroqueAgain1 wrote:I wonder how that chestnut with Kelley is doing.
I can't help but fear that any horse who colicks there now is going to be at risk of dying without a lot of veterinarian/clinic intervention. So many of those horses' digestive tracks must be in near shutdown.
I know, they are rationing water for them and they don't have enough to eat either. Help can't get there fast enough.

Shelley Blodgett‏ @ShelleyBlodgett
Kelley got to more horses today w/o water, dirty stalls, cuts. One even had angry iguana (likely fell in when roof came off. @CaribbeanOTTB
Image
Image
Image
Image
WarBiscuit
Posts: 1263
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 6:40 pm
Location: Mount Clemens, MI / Hawks Nest, WV

Fri Sep 29, 2017 4:28 pm

Recent Older Winners:

10yo g Bach's Homebrew (Milwaukee Brew - Lilly Cozzene, by Cozzene), 1st at Colombus (9/4/17). 63 - 20-11-8, $267,024. MSW.

11yo g I Am The King (Indy King - Star of the Ball, by Risen Star), 1st at Mountaineer (9/17/17). 85 - 21-17-9, $367,031.

11yo g Benjamin E. (Not So Fast - Ms. Bella, by Nickel Slot), 1st at Lincoln Race Course (9/15/17). 91 - 14-12-15, $71,090.

11yo g General Gabe (Congaree - Blazing Hot, by Irish River), 1st at Lethbridge (9/17/17). 61 - 15-18-10, $65,786.

10yo g What A Wildcat (Wildcat Heir - Not What I Do, by Parfaitement), 1st at Presque Isle Downs (9/19/17). 72 - 11-8-14, $153,909.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Placed: Toccets Charm - 10g, Raton Pass - 10g, Racy - 10g, Andrew L - 10g, Cherishistheword - 10g, Small Town - 10g,
Electric Alphabet - 10g, and good 'ol Box Top - 14g, still plugging away.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3rd: Bartletts - 12g, Again and Gone - 11g, Startingold - 10r, Won Fast Bullet - 10g, Classic Wildcat - 11g.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

These are some recently retired (or want to be) older horses that have often appeared in this thread, and are in need of good retirement homes:

12yo g Absolutely Lit - CANTER Illinois (1500.00)

10yo g White Post - CANTER West Virginia (2000.00) - still racing.

11yo g Willie Bags - CANTER Ohio - still searching for a home.

12yo m Coco Cobana - CANTER Ohio (1500.00) - still racing.

11yo g Safety Valve - CANTER Pennsylvania (1500.00)

12yo g Scatter Shot - CANTER Ohio (1000.00)

12yo g Juicy Point - CANTER Kentucky (1500.00)

10yo m Miss Tricky Me - CANTER Ohio (1000.00)

12yo g E.J. Little Boy - CANTER Ohio (1000.00)

10yo h Stroke - CANTER Kentucky (2500.00) - still racing.


WarBiscuit
Last edited by WarBiscuit on Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"One horse-laugh is worth ten thousand syllogisms. It is not only more effective; it is also vastly more intelligent." H.L. Mencken
BaroqueAgain1
Posts: 9532
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:16 pm

Fri Sep 29, 2017 5:16 pm

Seeing Stroke, a 10yo entire, on that list made me curious. All I could find on Bloodhorse is that he's by Stormy Atlantic. I do wonder why he's still a stallion at his age and I presume that, if someone steps up to adopt him, he's going to be getting a visit from the vet first. :shock:
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Fri Sep 29, 2017 8:06 pm

A little info on a couple of horses followed on this thread.

Shelley Blodgett‏ @ShelleyBlodgett
Replying to @trackandtack @EquineAltitude and 3 others
Victor Spider & SweetLandOfLiberty both colicked before storms. Were doing OK. Getting small, freq meals @CaribbeanOTTB & on 1/2 ration hay
User avatar
Miss Woodford
Posts: 994
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2013 3:34 pm

Sun Oct 01, 2017 11:36 pm

Classic Wildcat finished 1st by 3 1/4 lengths, on October 1, 2017, at LAUREL PARK in Race 11.
Off odds: 2.20
http://www.equibase.com/static/chart/pd ... 7USA11.pdf

Nice win for his 90th start. He's not the fastest horse on the track, but he's as fast (per Equibase/BSFs) at age 11 as he was as a 3/4yo.
User avatar
Sparrow Castle
Posts: 4713
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:40 pm

Finally! Kelley got the truck and drivers and picked up the shipment herself.

Shelley Blodgett‏ @ShelleyBlodgett
HAY in Puerto Rico!!!! 65 plts alfalfa & med supplies on trailer 2 @camareropr NOW @CaribbeanOTTB TY @TBCharities @AAEPHorseDocs @jockeyclub
Image
Image
Image
Image
Post Reply