The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby WaquoitNBroadBrush » Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:27 pm

WarBiscuit wrote:
Bell Zone - 10g (3 Races in 5 days!).


In the Long Strange Trip Department: I'd like to know how this Richard Bell homebred went from breaking maiden at Del Mar in 2010 to running three times in five days at Black Foot!
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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby WarBiscuit » Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:33 pm

WaquoitNBroadBrush wrote:
WarBiscuit wrote:
Bell Zone - 10g (3 Races in 5 days!).


In the Long Strange Trip Department: I'd like to know how this Richard Bell homebred went from breaking maiden at Del Mar in 2010 to running three times in five days at Black Foot!


Interesting, isn't it? Can be somewhat disturbing, as well. Falling down the ladder due to lack of competitiveness is a familiar story with many of these elderly runners. I don't know how Bell Zone ended up where he is - other than being just a victim of the mechanics of the low end of the sport. I was reading just today about another 10yo runner that has been mentioned on this thread a number of times, Becky's Kitten, a Ramsey horse (in case you didn't guess). Broke his maiden at Saratoga, been with more trainers than you can shake a stick at including Asmussen, Ward, Maker and a ton of unrecognizable names, tossed around like a rag doll, and finally ending up at Camarero where he continues to run in cheap claimers (125 starts to date). Makes me wonder if Mr. Ramsey keeps track of his old horses that still struggle on , and with all of the recent trouble in Puerto Rico and many of these animals now extremely desperate for food, if any attempt is made to help this Kittens Joy son out a bit? Just curious.

Many of these older horses that I continue to list here as winners are obviously well taken care of, resulting in their still being in decent shape on the track. But, I know all too well that a lot of them are in deep trouble. After all, to many of these low rent trainers - they are just horses. If you wreck one, you just get another, right?...

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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby WaquoitNBroadBrush » Fri Sep 22, 2017 6:36 pm

WarBiscuit wrote:
WaquoitNBroadBrush wrote:
WarBiscuit wrote:
Bell Zone - 10g (3 Races in 5 days!).


In the Long Strange Trip Department: I'd like to know how this Richard Bell homebred went from breaking maiden at Del Mar in 2010 to running three times in five days at Black Foot!


Interesting, isn't it? Can be somewhat disturbing, as well. Falling down the ladder due to lack of competitiveness is a familiar story with many of these elderly runners. I don't know how Bell Zone ended up where he is - other than being just a victim of the mechanics of the low end of the sport. I was reading just today about another 10yo runner that has been mentioned on this thread a number of times, Becky's Kitten, a Ramsey horse (in case you didn't guess). Broke his maiden at Saratoga, been with more trainers than you can shake a stick at including Asmussen, Ward, Maker and a ton of unrecognizable names, tossed around like a rag doll, and finally ending up at Camarero where he continues to run in cheap claimers (125 starts to date). Makes me wonder if Mr. Ramsey keeps track of his old horses that still struggle on , and with all of the recent trouble in Puerto Rico and many of these animals now extremely desperate for food, if any attempt is made to help this Kittens Joy son out a bit? Just curious.

Many of these older horses that I continue to list here as winners are obviously well taken care of, resulting in their still being in decent shape on the track. But, I know all too well that a lot of them are in deep trouble. After all, to many of these low rent trainers - they are just horses. If you wreck one, you just get another, right?...

WarBiscuit


Two words: Dale Baird.

I looked up a couple of the horses Bell Zone beat at Del Mar and they had career declines -- one to Golden Gate, the other to Canterbury -- but both are long retired. The Black Foot thing stood out because that's a Native American meet and most of the owners and trainers involved are Native American. Always wondered how thoroughbreds get to them.
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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby Sparrow Castle » Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:59 pm

Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc.
All 16 CTA retired racehorses are doing fine. Sadly, the Hipodromo Camarero racetrack was severely damaged by Hurricane Maria and communication is poor. Reports are there that none of the 800+ thoroughbreds at the track was killed, but there were some injuries (e.g., cuts and scrapes) that I’m told are being attended to. Many barns lost roofs, fencing, structures and trees came down, the facility flooded. Right now, the horses cannot leave their stalls because of heavy debris and flooding. They are standing in water and there is little water and hay. The people caring for the horses are doing the best they can in the circumstances. Also, there are efforts to get help from the States and Disaster Relief organizations. We will keep everyone posted with information as we learn it.
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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby WarBiscuit » Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:20 pm

Sparrow Castle wrote:Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc.
All 16 CTA retired racehorses are doing fine. Sadly, the Hipodromo Camarero racetrack was severely damaged by Hurricane Maria and communication is poor. Reports are there that none of the 800+ thoroughbreds at the track was killed, but there were some injuries (e.g., cuts and scrapes) that I’m told are being attended to. Many barns lost roofs, fencing, structures and trees came down, the facility flooded. Right now, the horses cannot leave their stalls because of heavy debris and flooding. They are standing in water and there is little water and hay. The people caring for the horses are doing the best they can in the circumstances. Also, there are efforts to get help from the States and Disaster Relief organizations. We will keep everyone posted with information as we learn it.


Thanks much for the continued reports. What a horrific situation for these horses and their people. I'm sure that CTA is grateful beyond measure for any help that they can get. Please consider helping them, even if it is only pocket change as it all adds up to buy food and supplies. And if the weather GODS happen to be reading this, they have had enough down there.

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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby Sparrow Castle » Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:20 pm

WarBiscuit wrote:
Sparrow Castle wrote:Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc.
All 16 CTA retired racehorses are doing fine. Sadly, the Hipodromo Camarero racetrack was severely damaged by Hurricane Maria and communication is poor. Reports are there that none of the 800+ thoroughbreds at the track was killed, but there were some injuries (e.g., cuts and scrapes) that I’m told are being attended to. Many barns lost roofs, fencing, structures and trees came down, the facility flooded. Right now, the horses cannot leave their stalls because of heavy debris and flooding. They are standing in water and there is little water and hay. The people caring for the horses are doing the best they can in the circumstances. Also, there are efforts to get help from the States and Disaster Relief organizations. We will keep everyone posted with information as we learn it.


Thanks much for the continued reports. What a horrific situation for these horses and their people. I'm sure that CTA is grateful beyond measure for any help that they can get. Please consider helping them, even if it is only pocket change as it all adds up to buy food and supplies. And if the weather GODS happen to be reading this, they have had enough down there.

WarBiscuit

Yes, the task ahead is tremendous and every little bit helps. The Caribbean islands have been devastated, so much suffering, and so many people depend on tourism to make a living. I wonder how well and how quickly the TB industry, the people and horses within it, can recover under the circumstances.

There are many people I follow on FB and/or Twitter that haven't been heard from yet. And we don't know the fate of the many horses that are racing or rehomed on St. Thomas, St. Croix, and Tortola. But I know communication is still awful, and I continue to remain hopeful.
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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby Sparrow Castle » Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:08 am

Maria Leaves Puerto Rican Racing in Total Disarray
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The heavily damaged grandstand at Camarero Racetrack
Thoroughbred breeding and racing industry in Puerto Rico was not spared the brunt of Hurricane Maria, which roared through the American territory earlier this week, causing massive structural damage to Camarero Race Track some 30 kilometers southwest of central San Juan and as-yet undetermined damage to the region’s horse farms.

Puerto Rican Racing Commissioner Jose A. Maymo issued an update to industry stakeholders late in the evening of Sept. 21, spelling out the details as he knew them. Maymo explained in his update that he had the opportunity to visit the heavily damaged grandstand and barn area at Camarero, calling the stables “shattered” with “90% of the cages [stalls] without their roofs.” Maymo confirmed there were no equine or human deaths reported at the track. He assured Camarero owners and trainers that the racing commission could be counted upon “to coordinate everything related to food supplies and beds” for the horses.

Maymo added that the tote board also suffered damage, but that efforts would be made to maintain the racing surface so that the horses may be able to train. The grandstand and surrounding areas and the clubhouse were destroyed, Maymo wrote. He added that a rebuilding effort would take months, but that there was no timetable. Maymo sounded a hopeful note, saying that this event “is an opportunity for a new beginning, a resurgence of our equestrianism.”

Maymo also assured industry participants that the Racing Commission would attempt to make arrangements for any Puerto Rican horses being pointed for the Serie Hipica del Caribe at Gulfstream Park Saturday, Dec. 9, to be transferred to South Florida.

“We will do everything in our power to achieve it,” Maymo wrote. “Puerto Rico…deserves to be represented as a sign that we are standing and that we will be stronger than ever.”

More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/maria-leaves-puerto-rican-racing-in-total-disarray/
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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby Sparrow Castle » Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:37 pm

A Twitter message from Shelley (CTA co-director in FL) and pictures of Camarero:
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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby Sparrow Castle » Sat Sep 23, 2017 2:20 pm

Letter to the Editor: Shelley Blodgett on Hurricane Maria
I am Shelley Blodgett, co-founder of Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Inc, a non-profit (501c3) that helps Thoroughbreds racing in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. I think there is a story that needs to get out.

There are 864 U.S. Thoroughbreds (all Jockey Club registered) stabled at Hipodromo Camarero Racetrack in Canóvanas, Puerto Rico. The racetrack, including the barns, was heavily damaged during Hurricane Maria. Further, the horses cannot leave their stalls due to debris, downed fencing and flooding. They are standing in water, and there is NO clean water or hay. I was told that they are giving them some grain (presumably without water). No horses died during the storm, but some needed stitches and such.

I learned this from a brief phone call from CTA co-founder, Kelley Stobie (the call was disconnected). She is at the track seven days a week, working as an equine therapist. She toured the track and spoke with the backstretch supervisor, some owners, trainer and vets. She told me the situation is dire and there is no way to get needed water, hay and medical supplies right now.

There is more to the story, but I’ll leave it at that for now. I’ve attached some photos I managed to get from the La Escuelita Hípica (the Jockey School at the track); they help with the track horses and posted this and have commented on the situation. Kelley also has photos, but cannot get them to me.

More than half of the Thoroughbreds in Puerto Rico were bred in the States. I have a line graph of numbers for both Puerto Rican-bred and U.S.-bred. There are some good horses there, including 2012 GI Belmont S. runner and 2013 Maxxam Gold Cup winner Unstoppable U, as well as Arch Traveler (who was also on the Triple Crown trail early in his career) and Becky’s Kitten. We gathered data and determined that 1,500 people have a stake in the racing industry in Puerto Rico (see pie chart). Thus, these horses are essential to the well being of many people in Puerto Rico.

I do not believe that there has been any formal request by the Puerto Rican government to help the horses at that time, but I have been working to rattle the bushes and get things moving. I have spoken with a veterinarian, who is an equine disaster response specialist and on the National Veterinary Response Team, but they cannot help until there is an official request to FEMA from the Puerto Rican government official. Also, I’ve spoken with the Secretary of Agriculture for U.S.V.I., Carlos Robles, but he has not been able to make contact with his counterpart in Puerto Rico, though I know he has sent him an email.

There are about 200 Thoroughbreds in St. Croix, including race horses and breeding farms, and there are 40 Thoroughbreds racing in St. Thomas and many OTTBs in rescue/aftercare as well. Mr. Robles is assessing the situation in U.S.V.I. and trying to initiate needed federal help down there. I have tried calling all of the CTA board members, which include a prominent breeder, an equine veterinarian and an attorney, but all cell service is out. Further, I’ve called the Racetrack Administrator, Jose Maymo, but his cell phone isn’t in service.

We really need the racing industry and other equine organizations in the States to help urgently as there is little time to waste. These horses survived the storm, but are facing dehydration, starvation and risk of secondary health issues (e.g., colic, infection) due to the environmental hazards and lack of basic needs. These are U.S. horses. They do their jobs faithfully as racehorses and deserve better. They support the livelihood of many in the islands. Thank You.

http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/letter-to-the-editor-shelley-blodgett-on-hurricane-maria/#.WcaiJwLvvVg.twitter
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Re: The WAR HORSE Chronicles

Postby WarBiscuit » Mon Sep 25, 2017 4:28 pm

Sounds like more help is on the way for Camarero horses.

www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/article ... t-camarero


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