Jockey/Trainer News - 2018

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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Mar 21, 2018 11:05 pm

The DRF article has been updated (from when I last read it) with quotes from his agent and friend.
Flores is hospitalized at Jefferson Torresdale Hospital in Philadelphia. He has been in a coma since Monday, when both Flores and his mount, Love Rules (Not For Love), suddenly crashed to the dirt as they were dueling between two other horses on the lead entering the far turn of the ninth race.

“I was home, I had just gotten done eating dinner, and I saw [the simulcast feed],” Yanuzzi said. “And right away I said, ‘Oh, man this is bad. I’ve got to go to the hospital.’

“He didn’t clip [heels],” Yanuzzi continued. “He was in between horses, tightly grouped. The horse broke its shoulder. Normally when a horse breaks its shoulder, they hit the ground very quickly. When a horse [suffers a lower leg injury] they can sometimes get the horse pulled up. But he went down so quickly that probably the force of the horse going down dragged his face and head into the ground. And then another horse ran directly over him.”

Love Rules was euthanized. The horse and jockey that fell over Flores and Love Rules, plus another mount that dislodged its rider trying to avoid the accident, all escaped serious injury.

“According to what the doctors said, when Jose hit the ground he felt no pain,” Yanuzzi said. “He was, basically, for all intents and purposes, gone. He had internal bleeding. They brought him in, his heart stopped, then they got it started. But he had massive cranial injuries. His brain stem was compromised, and he also had catastrophic injuries to his spine. He had no brain function at all.”

Yanuzzi said plans are in the works to establish a GoFundMe online fundraising page to assist Flores’s family and children. Details will be published as soon as they are available.
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/fl ... wednesday/
Ziggypop
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 10:34 am

Sparrow Castle wrote:The DRF article has been updated (from when I last read it) with quotes from his agent and friend.
Flores is hospitalized at Jefferson Torresdale Hospital in Philadelphia. He has been in a coma since Monday, when both Flores and his mount, Love Rules (Not For Love), suddenly crashed to the dirt as they were dueling between two other horses on the lead entering the far turn of the ninth race.

“I was home, I had just gotten done eating dinner, and I saw [the simulcast feed],” Yanuzzi said. “And right away I said, ‘Oh, man this is bad. I’ve got to go to the hospital.’

“He didn’t clip [heels],” Yanuzzi continued. “He was in between horses, tightly grouped. The horse broke its shoulder. Normally when a horse breaks its shoulder, they hit the ground very quickly. When a horse [suffers a lower leg injury] they can sometimes get the horse pulled up. But he went down so quickly that probably the force of the horse going down dragged his face and head into the ground. And then another horse ran directly over him.”

Love Rules was euthanized. The horse and jockey that fell over Flores and Love Rules, plus another mount that dislodged its rider trying to avoid the accident, all escaped serious injury.

“According to what the doctors said, when Jose hit the ground he felt no pain,” Yanuzzi said. “He was, basically, for all intents and purposes, gone. He had internal bleeding. They brought him in, his heart stopped, then they got it started. But he had massive cranial injuries. His brain stem was compromised, and he also had catastrophic injuries to his spine. He had no brain function at all.”

Yanuzzi said plans are in the works to establish a GoFundMe online fundraising page to assist Flores’s family and children. Details will be published as soon as they are available.
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/fl ... wednesday/
lost a dear childhood friend to brain stem injury, sustained from a polo accident somewhat similar to this accident. Blessings to his family, friends and colleagues.
BaroqueAgain1
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 1:28 pm

That is a stunningly detailed account of what happened to Jose. It could not have been easy for his friend to write that, but it gives us a sobering view into just how dangerous race riding can be, and how fast catastrophe can strike.
:(
stark
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 2:06 pm

Thursday 12:45pm.

RIP.
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
stark
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 2:06 pm

Thursday 12:45pm.

RIP.
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
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Sparrow Castle
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 2:14 pm

Jockey Jose Flores dies as a result of spill-related injuries
Jockey Jose Luis Flores, a winner of 4,650 races, died Thursday afternoon after suffering severe cranial and spinal injuries in a spill during the ninth race at Parx Racing on Monday. Flores’s death was confirmed by his agent of 14 years, David Yannuzzi.

Love Rules and Flores were dueling for the lead between horses on the far turn of the six-furlong starter allowance when Love Rules fell. A trailing horse, The Pooch, fell over Love Rules and Flores. A third horse, Easy River, unseated his rider while avoiding the two fallen horses.

Flores was taken to Aria Jefferson Torresdale Hospital in Philadelphia but never regained consciousness. An organ donor, he was kept on life support while his parents traveled from Florida to say their goodbyes and until a time could be coordinated with surgeons and organ recipients.

Flores died at 12:42 p.m. Eastern on Thursday after being taken off life support.
http://www.drf.com/news/jockey-jose-flo ... d-injuries
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Sparrow Castle
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 2:20 pm

Hovdey: Peril of riding knows no age discrimination
Professional football players are physically impaired by the time they reach their early 30s. Basketball, baseball, and tennis players might last a bit longer, but usually it isn’t pretty, while pro golfers can be competitive, if not consistent, at the highest levels into their 40s.

Then there are jockeys. No professional sport is populated with more viable players who have passed half a century. The most famous among them make news with regularity, with stories invariably highlighting their age.

And why not? Mike Smith, 52, rode champions West Coast and Unique Bella in 2017 and figures to make more noise with both this year. Gary Stevens, 55, has found a breath of fresh air at Oaklawn Park and is angling for a viable Kentucky Derby ride. Tammy Piermarini, who turned 50 last year, is determined to add to her total as the third-leading female rider of all time. And the last time anyone checked, Perry Ouzts was 64, with 6,888 wins, and planned to be at work in July when he turns 65.

Calvin Borel, Jose Ferrer, Stewart Elliott, Martin Pedroza – the list is long, and the riders who populate the list provide a continuity to the game that is comforting to their fans. But the risks of competing into the twilight of a demanding physical endeavor are ever present. The dangers of the game have no respect for the age of the players, who live by the hoary cliché that requires daily navigation:

“It’s not a matter of if, but when.”
http://www.drf.com/news/hovdey-peril-ri ... rimination
Ziggypop
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 3:48 pm

RIP. Condolences to his family, friends and colleagues.
peeptoad
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 5:14 pm

This is such a tragedy. My heart goes out to his family and friends.
Catalina
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Location: South Texas

Thu Mar 22, 2018 5:46 pm

RIP, Jose Flores. You and your family are in the thoughts and prayers of many.
WarBiscuit
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 5:51 pm

Very sad. RIP, Mr. Flores.

WarBiscuit
"One horse-laugh is worth ten thousand syllogisms. It is not only more effective; it is also vastly more intelligent." H.L. Mencken
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Ridan_Remembered
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 6:50 pm

Truly heartbreaking news. I'm including the following as my form of tribute to Jose Flores and all jockeys.

At the tail end of the DRF article announcing his death, it says: "According to Terry Meyocks, national manager of the Jockeys’ Guild, the last rider to die from injuries sustained in a race was Mario Chavez at Will Rogers Downs in October 2017. Flores is the 157th rider to perish from race-related injuries since the Guild began keeping such statistics in 1940."

157 riders divided by 78 years -- that works out to 2 riders a year to die of race-related injuries. That's shocking, but it is a fact that is not widely known. The sport has just got to do the very best possible job to minimize catastrophic breakdowns, and to find ways to help protect jockeys when they do go down. Research into specialized equipment such as better helmets and thin, light body armor could help, but as always it comes down to a lack of a centralized governing body to push and coordinate such research.
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Treve
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 9:27 pm

That is actually a lot lower than I would have guessed. To put it in perspective:
In Australia it's estimated 20 people die every year of horse related injuries, this includes all areas of riding and equestrian activities. 24 million people in Australia.
In British Columbia, Canada on average 3 people die a year. BC has a population of 4.6 million.
I didn't find any definitive answer for the USA but I did find this from the CDC:
Although no national estimates exist for the number of fatal injuries associated with horseback riding, a review of state medical examiner records from 27 states for 1976-1987 identified 205 such deaths.
That's about 19 deaths per year, for roughly half the USA, which has a population of 325 million... (compare that to Australia and it would suggest horse-related safety is much higher stateside)
Considering how dangerous racing is compared to the majority of other equestrian activities (not all but, generally) those are actually comparatively some pretty good odds.

Most serious and fatal horse related injuries are head injuries. There is only so much that can be done to realistically protect one's neck in a context like this. In terms of the head I know helmet companies work all the time to improve the safety features. I believe most racing helmets are as good as any as they're primarily made by the premium helmet brands as far as I know.

And out of any equestrian sport besides eventing, jockeys and exercise riders all systematically wear protective body armour. Although perhaps, since eventers now have the inflatable body vests that also create an additional cushion for the neck and head, perhaps that could be integrated somehow? Silks would have to be in a very stretchy material but it could work...
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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Sparrow Castle
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Thu Mar 22, 2018 9:45 pm

Thanks for that, Treve.

There are some things being done in horse racing at a national level, but there's never enough funding and research for things like this. And I'm not sure the small to mid-level tracks do much to act on what's out there. Yes, that's where a national commissioner office might make a difference.

Of course, the biggest impact on jockey safety would be preventing the causes of racehorse falls in racing and training. There's only so much equipment can do to prevent injury/death to jockeys hitting the ground at 40 MPH.

The Jockey Club has been working on several Safety Initiatives and the Equine Injury Database is producing data and strategies that have driven the equine fatality rate to 1.54 from 2.0 per 1,000 starts since it's inception in 2009.
http://www.jockeyclub.com/Default.asp?s ... acy&area=4

It was a little higher for 2017 (1.61) - but not statistically significant. On turf surfaces, there were 1.36 fatalities and on dirt 1.74 fatalities. The rate of fatalities on synthetic surfaces is lowest of all at 1.0 per 1,000 starts. There has been a 20% drop in the risk of fatal injury across all surfaces, a 17% drop in risk of fatal injury on dirt, and a 30% drop in risk of fatal injury on turf.
http://www.theracingbiz.com/2018/03/19/ ... lity-rate/

I've read reports about improvements in jockey safety helmets and vests, but don't know how many jockeys buy and use the newest models. Many jockeys don't make a whole lot of money each year. And as with the NFL, the technology just isn't good enough yet.

For anyone so inclined:
Ray Paulick @raypaulick
54m54 minutes ago
This Go Fund Me page, established by family friend and fellow jockey Maria Remedio, is to help the family of jockey Jose Luis Flores deal with the tragic loss from Monday's racing accident. The page has been confirmed as legitimate.
https://www.gofundme.com/dealing-with-a-loss
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Ridan_Remembered
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Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:19 am

Treve wrote:That is actually a lot lower than I would have guessed. To put it in perspective:
In Australia it's estimated 20 people die every year of horse related injuries, this includes all areas of riding and equestrian activities. 24 million people in Australia.
With genuine respect, you missed the big point: Do better.
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Treve
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Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:41 am

Ridan_Remembered wrote:
Treve wrote:That is actually a lot lower than I would have guessed. To put it in perspective:
In Australia it's estimated 20 people die every year of horse related injuries, this includes all areas of riding and equestrian activities. 24 million people in Australia.
With genuine respect, you missed the big point: Do better.
I feel as though if you had more thoroughly ready my post you would see and understand I missed the point. Just the opposite. I address some of your concerns, in fact, the ones you specifically stated at the end of your post, and the ones I did not, Sparrow Castle did. You clamoured for authorities to do better, and Sparrow Castle and I offered numbers and information showing that we are doing better, and asking the question what more can we do at this point in time? Which wasn't rhetorical by the way, it's a legitimate question about how can that actually be done in a concrete manner. We even both offered up additional possible, if speculative issues and solutions.
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
stark
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Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:58 pm

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. – Hall of Fame rider Gary Stevens moved his tack from Southern California to base at Oaklawn in January. Rather than returning to California, he will be making another change after the Oaklawn meet ends April 14.

Stevens said Thursday he intends to ride at Keeneland, Churchill Downs, and Saratoga through the spring and summer. He said he last was based at Keeneland in 2005. Next year, it is his intention to return to Oaklawn.

“That’s the plan,” Stevens said.
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
stark
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Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:39 pm

Jockey Chantal Sutherland, injured in an accident at Fair Grounds on Jan. 25, will return to her native Canada and begin riding again with the opening of Woodbine on April 21, she said this week at Fair Grounds.

Sutherland fractured her left collarbone and right knee in the accident. Sutherland had surgery for her injuries on Jan. 26 and said she had a plate put in to support the collarbone, and another to support the knee.

Sutherland said she has been cleared to get on horses again on April 12 and said Don Parente would be her agent at Woodbine.
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Mar 23, 2018 2:26 pm

Treve wrote:
Ridan_Remembered wrote:
Treve wrote:That is actually a lot lower than I would have guessed. To put it in perspective:
In Australia it's estimated 20 people die every year of horse related injuries, this includes all areas of riding and equestrian activities. 24 million people in Australia.
With genuine respect, you missed the big point: Do better.
I feel as though if you had more thoroughly ready my post you would see and understand I missed the point. Just the opposite. I address some of your concerns, in fact, the ones you specifically stated at the end of your post, and the ones I did not, Sparrow Castle did. You clamoured for authorities to do better, and Sparrow Castle and I offered numbers and information showing that we are doing better, and asking the question what more can we do at this point in time? Which wasn't rhetorical by the way, it's a legitimate question about how can that actually be done in a concrete manner. We even both offered up additional possible, if speculative issues and solutions.
While acknowledging and supporting the need to do better, I also think it's important to recognize the strides we have made. If horse people don't do that, nobody will.
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Treve
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Joined: Fri May 08, 2015 5:12 pm

Sat Mar 24, 2018 8:16 am

Exactly, I agree. And I for one was really pleased to see how far the breakdown rate has gone down, I really appreciated the information, SC.
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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